Linked by fran on Sun 20th Feb 2011 19:00 UTC
Google "Over the last few months we have been hard at work getting Native Client ready to support the new Pepper plug-in interface. Native Client is an open source technology that allows you to build web applications that seamlessly and safely execute native compiled code inside the browser. Today, we've reached an important milestone in our efforts to make Native Client modules as portable and secure as JavaScript, by making available a first release of the revamped Native Client .[...]In the coming months we will be adding APIs for 3D graphics, local file storage, WebSockets, peer-to-peer networking, and more. We'll also be working on Dynamic Shared Objects (DSOs), a feature that will eventually allow us to provide Application Binary Interface (ABI) stability."
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RE[3]: Comment by moondevil
by kragil on Mon 21st Feb 2011 08:21 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by moondevil"
kragil
Member since:
2006-01-04

View source might help you learn JS and all, but once an application reaches a certain complexity it doesn't help you anymore.

Do you read the complete code of gmail, foursquare, wave? I think any JS that is generated and/or compressed is not consumable by humans.
Same will be true for PNacl.

There is only a slight difference between Eclipse compiling your code down to JS or to LLVM bitcode.

Edited 2011-02-21 08:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by moondevil
by Kroc on Mon 21st Feb 2011 11:40 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by moondevil"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

I think any JS that is generated and/or compressed is not consumable by humans.


But it can still be queried by machines. It can be probed, debugged, logged, analyzed. It cannot permanently hide its secrets.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by moondevil
by pmac on Mon 21st Feb 2011 12:39 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by moondevil"
pmac Member since:
2009-07-08

But it can still be queried by machines. It can be probed, debugged, logged, analyzed. It cannot permanently hide its secrets.


All of these things are true of flash, with the right tool. If you give me a SWF file, and some compressed, obfuscated JavaScript code, I could find out a whole lot more about the SWF. In fact, Adobe provide a free tool to convert a SWF file into a SWFX file, which is basically an XML representation of the SWF. I don't see why people always point to Flash as an example of big-bad-evil-closed-technology. It's simply not true. The Flash player itself might be a piece of crap, but that's a different argument.

Edited 2011-02-21 12:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3