Linked by lemur2 on Tue 22nd Feb 2011 22:37 UTC
Qt A first alpha version of a Qt implementation for the Android mobile operating system has been announced by Romanian software developer Bogdan Vatra. Since Nokia in co-operation with Microsoft have announced that it does not intend to develop a Windows Phone variant of the GUI framework, Qt for Android represents the only remaining route/platfrom to providing mobile phone apps developed using Qt.
Thread beginning with comment 463649
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

No, not disparage, but rather ENCOURAGE Encourage devs to use the native toolkit on different platforms. Encourage devs to create apps that leverage the strengths of different platforms. Encourage devs to give users the native experience they deserve. Encourage devs not to create lazy half-assed, "cross platform" UI apps. Encourage users to use different platforms and have a native experience. Encourage devs to learn about the different native languages: Objective-C, C# and Java of each platform.


Meanwhile, some developers who want the widest market for their write-once application will simply ignore your "encouragement", use Qt and get a fine-looking well-behaved native-widget application on multiple platforms with a minimum of fuss and without having to do any re-writes.

With more people to sell to for less work, guess which developers will be better off?

Reply Parent Score: 5

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

This is precisely what developers should avoid. Do not shortchange an experience to make a quick buck.

Seriously, use a programming pattern and separate your UI from your backend logic. Write a native UI frontend for every host platform and you will reap the benefits of superior integration.

Qt is good, hell it's nice, but it's not native. On mobile, the feeling of nativity is even more pronounced because the interaction methods are relatively more limited.

Someone who's used Android for a while is going to very harshly feel the differences in a Qt application. Most of these native controls have very specific animation timings, gesture responsiveness, and so on, which means that anything even slightly off is indeed noticeable.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

Qt is good, hell it's nice, but it's not native.

We're not talking about interpreted programs, but compiled ones, with different resultant code depending on the target platform.

"Qt uses the native graphics APIs of each platform it supports"
http://qt.nokia.com/products

For example, I've used Qt Creator in Linux and Windows and the controls were the ones from each operating system.

Reply Parent Score: 3

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Seriously, use a programming pattern and separate your UI from your backend logic. Write a native UI frontend for every host platform and you will reap the benefits of superior integration.


Seriously, software developers know the benefits of using native controls but do not have unlimited time and resources. Learning a new language and system takes time that many do not have.

Someone who's used Android for a while is going to very harshly feel the differences in a Qt application.


That's ridiculous. Most mobile applications are games which don't need to look native. IOS applications of all types don't have a consistent look.

Reply Parent Score: 4

boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

A minimum of development fuss. Arranging to distribute Qt with your app is somewhat annoying.

Reply Parent Score: 2