Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 22nd Feb 2011 23:26 UTC
Windows Ever since the successful development and launch of Windows 7, Microsoft has become ever tighter-lipped about Windows development. Sure, it dropped the bomb about releasing Windows 8 for ARM, but that's it. Nothing on features or timetables (other than 'three years after Windows 7'). Well, the usually well-connected (inside Microsoft, that is) Mary-Jo Foley now claims to have a legit development roadmap - and it seems everything is on track for a Windows 8 beta in September 2011.
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The Microsoft Tax?
by shotsman on Wed 23rd Feb 2011 12:46 UTC
shotsman
Member since:
2005-07-22

There are a number of ifs to all be true I can't help wondering if will MS try to insist that all ARM powered Desktops/netbooks/laptops be sold only with Windows 8?

Or
Will the mainstream PC makers (Dell, Lenovo etc) just decide to 'say no'?

I really hope so.

Will MS try to dictate the HW configs like they did with Netbooks?
I do hope that someone will have the balls to standup to them and tell them to go take a hike. Sadly, IMHO these comanies are just like sheep being driven by the MS Sheepdog right into the pen, into the truck and off for slaughter.

Reply Score: 0

RE: The Microsoft Tax?
by Karitku on Wed 23rd Feb 2011 12:57 in reply to "The Microsoft Tax?"
Karitku Member since:
2006-01-12

It's all true. Microsoft is forcing OEMs to build machines using blueprints that they provide. Microsoft also own those blueprints so they must redesign whole systems if they try to use other OS. They also force them to use only Windows Phone, in fact you need to buy certain amount Windows Phone licenses if you make both tablets and phones. I also know they sabotage certain drivers if OEMs don't follow guidances. Updates won't mystically install or devices won't, it all aims to make OEM look bad.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: The Microsoft Tax?
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 23rd Feb 2011 13:24 in reply to "RE: The Microsoft Tax?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Lolwut?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: The Microsoft Tax?
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 23rd Feb 2011 13:26 in reply to "The Microsoft Tax?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Will MS try to dictate the HW configs like they did with Netbooks?


Hardware makers were free to ignore the Windows-specified limits and make Linux netbooks. In fact, they did - massively. It's just that no one bought them.

Go play somewhere else, troll.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: The Microsoft Tax?
by TechGeek on Wed 23rd Feb 2011 17:31 in reply to "RE: The Microsoft Tax?"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

Actually what he said is true. Microsoft did dictate that companies who were receiving Windows for basically free for the netbooks had to limit the specs of the netbook. There were limits on drive size, ram, and screen size. And the only way to be profitable was to sell Windows. So the OEM's were kind of in a bind as it cost too much to have separate hardware lines for Linux and Windows. There is no technological reason why you couldn't have 4 gigs of ram in a netbook, Microsoft just didn't want it eating into their sales.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: The Microsoft Tax?
by lemur2 on Thu 24th Feb 2011 01:31 in reply to "RE: The Microsoft Tax?"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Will MS try to dictate the HW configs like they did with Netbooks?
Hardware makers were free to ignore the Windows-specified limits and make Linux netbooks. In fact, they did - massively. It's just that no one bought them. Go play somewhere else, troll. "

Actually, Linux netbooks were selling like hotcakes in the store one minute, and then Microsoft took XP Home back off the shelf, blew the cobwebs away, and "provided" it to OEMs. Within a week of XP Home shipping in stores, all stock of Linux was removed. At some stores local to me there were plenty of Linux netbooks in store when literally overnight they were removed, and from that point on ONLY XP Home netbooks were offered for sale.

Naturally people stopped buying Linux netbooks from stores when there were none to buy in the store any more.

Meanwhile, in some countries with a fair market, or in other sales situations such as online sales, Linux netbooks still represent about 33% of netbook sales.

Reply Parent Score: 3