Linked by Gregory on Sat 26th Feb 2011 16:51 UTC
Intel "Intel is pleased to announce the BIOS Implementation Test Suite, a bootable pre-OS environment for testing BIOSes and in particular their initialization of Intel processors, hardware, and technologies. BITS can verify your BIOS against many Intel recommendations. In addition, BITS includes Intel's official reference code as provided to BIOS, which you can use to override your BIOS's hardware initialization with a known-good configuration, and then boot an OS."
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TheGZeus
Member since:
2010-05-19

Ah, but do any consumer-grade AMD boards work with coreboot? I'm not setting up a cluster, I'm setting up a workstation.

Reply Parent Score: 2

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

A BIOS is not a bootloader. I fail to see what difference a BIOS implementation test suite can possibly make to someone purchasing a single workstation.

Reply Parent Score: 2

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

A BIOS is not a bootloader.

A number of OS developers who've lived in hatred of the thing for decades disagree with that.
Gee, a bootloader that allows one to completely customise the boot process and replace behaviour set by the vendor of your motherboard... yeah, that sounds completely useless.

Reply Parent Score: 2

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Also, I don't think you read all the things this is claiming to be capable of doing, like altering the settings made by the BIOS, and not being a binary blob soldered to your motherboard.
Seriously, just because that's the intended purpose doesn't mean that's the only possible use.

GNU Screen was originally intended to add the ability to run multiple programs while on a single serial terminal, but today it's mostly used for its ability to detach and continue running, and it's also been the inspiration for a number of 'run and detach' programs.

In any case, the code looks greatly interesting.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Let's see, I have a SSD in my desktop machine and Ubuntu with me logging in and starting up some applications takes less time to load than the BIOS.

A simpler, slimmer BIOS is definitely something I would want. I think coreboot even can do initialization in parallel so that should really help startup performance.

Linux really needs very little BIOS anyway.

So yes, Coreboot is something I would consider if it was available for my chipset for my desktop machine.

Reply Parent Score: 2

pgeorgi Member since:
2010-02-18

Ah, but do any consumer-grade AMD boards work with coreboot?

Asrock E350M1 is work in progress, and that's hardly a cluster system.

Reply Parent Score: 1

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Cool, but "a work in progress" is still... that.

Reply Parent Score: 2