Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Mon 28th Feb 2011 11:23 UTC, submitted by Joao Luis
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "Now that the dust has settled after Stephen Elop's big announcement on the 11th February 2011, many have come to realise that actually Nokia's move towards a a new Ecosystem is not as bad as what they thought. [...] But what does all this mean for the Nokia Developers? When the proposed partnership with Microsoft was announced, many felt betrayed and worried about their future, but after having heard and assisted a number of workshops at the Nokia Developer Day at this years Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, earlier this month, their outlook towards the new ecosystem has taken a 180 degree turn and are now looking at the proposed partnership with a lot more enthusiasm, recognising the potential it will bring them in the coming months."
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Not2Sure
Member since:
2009-12-07

Elop made a decision in the best interest of Elop, not Nokia shareholders. There is little short-term or mid-term gain for Nokia's profitability. The complete incompetence shown by Elop and his team announcing this partnership ("all-in") has basically prematurely ended the revenue stream of existing Nokia devices on the market in exchange for creating 0/zero/none excitement about a non-existent future product. No one will buy a new gadget that is known to be end-of-life. They f*cked that up royally and took down those of us who invested many years in Nokia ecosystem.

Long-term success of WP7 is even a riskier proposition than Meego ever was. No one who is thinking of buying a new smartphone will consider a WP7 phone over an iOS/Android/Blackberry device for at least several product iterations if ever.

The next shareholder's meeting is going to be pretty fun. Directors are going to either be shown the door, invited to resign, or Nokia as a EU technology company ceases to exist. Pretty much the bottom line.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Elop made a decision in the best interest of Elop, not Nokia shareholders. There is little short-term or mid-term gain for Nokia's profitability. The complete incompetence shown by Elop and his team announcing this partnership ("all-in") has basically prematurely ended the revenue stream of existing Nokia devices on the market in exchange for creating 0/zero/none excitement about a non-existent future product. No one will buy a new gadget that is known to be end-of-life. They f*cked that up royally and took down those of us who invested many years in Nokia ecosystem.


Oh yeah, Symbian, which sells as much volume as Android does in its entirety, is going to, over night, just fall off of the map because of a partnership with Microsoft. Keep dreaming.

In fact, given Symbian's current trajectory, it is likely they'll meet their sales figure before finally sunsetting the Symbian platform.

And Nokia has had like 10 articles on OSNews in the past month, several articles in the tech blogosphere, and mentioned in various major news networks. Yeah, to say they created no buzz is dishonest.

By all indications, Windows Phone 7 met the expectations of both carriers and most OEMs, so I don't think its a reach to expect this kind of momentum to continue with more investment.

They have a growing developer ecosystem, which is growing on par with the Android ecosystem, and outpacing the iOS ecosystem in momentum.


Long-term success of WP7 is even a riskier proposition than Meego ever was. No one who is thinking of buying a new smartphone will consider a WP7 phone over an iOS/Android/Blackberry device for at least several product iterations if ever.


Oh come on. WP7 is officially in the conversation now. There is awareness, and it will only grow. You need to look no further than when Android was but a whisper in people's ears in the form of the G1. Things can change, very quickly. After all, the iPhone only arrived in 2006.


The next shareholder's meeting is going to be pretty fun. Directors are going to either be shown the door, invited to resign, or Nokia as a EU technology company ceases to exist. Pretty much the bottom line.


It always amuses me when people swear up and down they understand the corporate apparatus ;) . Nokia has chosen a new direction, its only direction, and sometimes true greatness requires pragmatism and pioneering. Look for the best way forward, and in this case, the best way forward happens to come from Redmond.

Reply Parent Score: 3

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Oh come on. WP7 is officially in the conversation now. There is awareness, and it will only grow. You need to look no further than when Android was but a whisper in people's ears in the form of the G1. Things can change, very quickly. After all, the iPhone only arrived in 2006.

The flaw in your logic here is that Microsoft was behind here every single time. The real killer for Microsoft is that applications were appearing for the iPhone and now for Android giving them a strong installed base and inertia. The difference with Android is that it had greater supply with different phones being able to run it, but it's still taken a long time for Android's application base to catch up to iOS.

Microsoft are not going to get another chance and simply bulldoze their way in I'm afraid.

It always amuses me when people swear up and down they understand the corporate apparatus ;) . Nokia has chosen a new direction, its only direction, and sometimes true greatness requires pragmatism and pioneering.

RPTFL. Becoming an OEM for Microsoft when they have miniscule market share is not exactly pionerring.

Look for the best way forward, and in this case, the best way forward happens to come from Redmond.

Saying that won't make it true I'm afraid. You haven't painted a very compelling case at all, and in many ways have outright contradicted yourself.

Reply Parent Score: 3