Linked by David Adams on Thu 3rd Mar 2011 20:23 UTC, submitted by Amy Bennett
Hardware, Embedded Systems IDC's newest survey of server vendors shows boxes running every kind of operating system -- except Unix -- sold more during the last three months of 2010. Sales of Linux servers rose 29 percent; Windows rose 16.8 percent, but most surprisingly, sales of mainframes shot up 69 percent " the highest growth rate IDC ever found on mainframes.
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TechGeek
Member since:
2006-01-14

The original poster of this line is deluded. IBM is the predominate mainframe maker in the world. AND they sell Linux on their mainframes. I know they support Red Hat but you might be able to get Suse also.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Kebabbert Member since:
2007-07-27

The original poster of this line is deluded. IBM is the predominate mainframe maker in the world. AND they sell Linux on their mainframes. I know they support Red Hat but you might be able to get Suse also.

It is interesting to speak with sysadmins about the Mainframes running Linux: they say it really sucks. That Linux is unstable and they encounter all sorts of problem.

On top of that, a mainframe is not that fast, cpu wise. Any highend x86 cpu is at least twice as fast. In fact, a better number would be 5x faster. So you need 5 Mainframe cpus to match one high end x86 cpu. This is true, and I can provide links and articles that proves this fact.

MAinframe cpus are good at RAS. That reliability costs a fortune. They are very reliable and tailor made for reliability. But they are not fast.

x86 are very fast, but very unstable and buggy. Every once in a while, intel and AMD has to withdraw x86 cpus because of bugs. Mainframe cpus are not buggy, but they are slow.

Reply Parent Score: 3

abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

On top of that, a mainframe is not that fast, cpu wise. Any highend x86 cpu is at least twice as fast. In fact, a better number would be 5x faster. So you need 5 Mainframe cpus to match one high end x86 cpu. This is true, and I can provide links and articles that proves this fact.

MAinframe cpus are good at RAS. That reliability costs a fortune. They are very reliable and tailor made for reliability. But they are not fast.

x86 are very fast, but very unstable and buggy. Every once in a while, intel and AMD has to withdraw x86 cpus because of bugs. Mainframe cpus are not buggy, but they are slow.


Total BS. IBM's z196 is a 5.2 Ghz, 4 core processor. The last time I looked it was the world's fastest processor.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Subcomputer Member since:
2011-01-21

Yeah, I'm curious as to how Linux on the mainframe evolves in the future, since the systems really are that different.

There's really two reasons to be using a mainframe these days, and cpu power certainly isn't one of them. They really are designed for two things these days - massive database loads, and reliability. There's a reason a good percent of banks and insurance companies have mainframes, they have ridiculous levels of i/o compared to your average system.

As far as reliability, not only are the processors mirrored into a form of raid-1, with the z196 they've introduced raid for ram as well. Then of course you use parallel sysplex to mirror a few entire systems. There's always a market for reliability like that. It may not be large, but until x86 systems start offering similar facilities the mainframe won't be going away.

Reply Parent Score: 1