Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 7th Mar 2011 19:31 UTC, submitted by Debjit
Gnome I have to admit I've been struggling with this one for a while, most importantly because I haven't used GNOME 3 yet; I'm setting up my own little company right now, so time's a little short. As such, all I can do here is cover the arguments given - which, in my book, have both their strong as well as their weak points. Yes, GNOME 3 will not have buttons for minimising or maximising windows.
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RE[2]: So....
by JMcCarthy on Mon 7th Mar 2011 21:26 UTC in reply to "RE: So...."
JMcCarthy
Member since:
2005-08-12

KDE has it, and I would argue they actually did it better than Microsoft for one simple reason: If you have a multi display setup, say 1280x1024 * 2, the snap feature works on 0 1280 and 2560 whereas in Windows it's only 0 and 2560.

Microsoft was the first to do it though.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: So....
by Stratoukos on Mon 7th Mar 2011 22:39 in reply to "RE[2]: So...."
Stratoukos Member since:
2009-02-11

While the windows don't snap between screen boundaries, you can still use the Win+arrows shortcuts to make a window snap on the right side of the left screen (and any other combination). I'm really not sure what would be the best approach here. On one hand, snapping on every screen edge would be more consistent. On the other hand having windows snap when trying to move them from one screen to another could get annoying.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: So....
by phoenix on Tue 8th Mar 2011 05:51 in reply to "RE[3]: So...."
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

While the windows don't snap between screen boundaries, you can still use the Win+arrows shortcuts to make a window snap on the right side of the left screen (and any other combination). I'm really not sure what would be the best approach here. On one hand, snapping on every screen edge would be more consistent. On the other hand having windows snap when trying to move them from one screen to another could get annoying.


KWin handles this quite nicely. Drag a window near a screen edge and a border appears to let you know the window will:
- maximise vertically and cover 50% of screen starting on that edge, or
- maximise to cover entire screen

With multiple monitors, the border will flicker over the right-hand 50% of left screen, then left-hand 50% of right screen, then disappear as you continue dragging.

Works very well.

While Win7 may have done it first, KWin really does it much better.

Reply Parent Score: 4