Linked by David Adams on Mon 7th Mar 2011 17:55 UTC
FreeBSD "How long have you been using FreeBSD. Months? Years? Decades? And you love using it because of whatever reason but at the same time you're feeling a bit guilty to use it all for free without giving anything back? Well now you'll have the chance to change that. We at FreeBSD are always in need of new people who are willing to spare some of their time and effort into FreeBSD development."
Thread beginning with comment 465227
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[3]: maybe its the license
by Liquidator on Tue 8th Mar 2011 09:46 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: maybe its the license"
Liquidator
Member since:
2007-03-04

Personally, I need the desktop part of FreeBSD. I know there's PC-BSD, but let's consider only FreeBSD, which is the topic we're discussing. I just need Opera, which works properly, the Adobe Reader and Flash plugins, which both don't work seemlessly on FreeBSD. There's not much we can do about it. We have been working hard trying to find patches, hacks to make them work better, with little success. We have signed petitions, with no results from Adobe. The solution for me has been to move to Linux, sadly.

Other than that, in order to have a clean, working FreeBSD desktop, you need to spend heck of a time to install stuff using the terminal, edit files, etc... To configure your D.E. and other things that take seconds on Windows or Linux. The Gnome default theme is old too...There is no working equivalent to Synaptic or Yast for FreeBSD. Ports and packages very often return errors when installing or compiling, and you need to ask for help on the FreeBSD forum. Versions of apps are older than on Linux repos. Even less hardware is supported (terrible for hardware such as HDMI capture boards, newer printers, newer scanners, DVB boards...).Overall, it takes more time and effort to get what you expect from a modern desktop. I'm not saying it can't be done.

So in order to get back to FreeBSD, many things need to be improved, but it's sadly not always possible because it depends on third parties (software vendors and hardware manufacturers).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: maybe its the license
by vodoomoth on Tue 8th Mar 2011 10:29 in reply to "RE[3]: maybe its the license"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30

Other than that, in order to have a clean, working FreeBSD desktop, you need to spend heck of a time to install stuff using the terminal, edit files, etc... To configure your D.E. and other things that take seconds on Windows or Linux. The Gnome default theme is old too...There is no working equivalent to Synaptic or Yast for FreeBSD. Ports and packages very often return errors when installing or compiling, and you need to ask for help on the FreeBSD forum.

Having had that exact experience just weeks ago, I totally understand this. And that's why I've chosen PC-BSD, not installed yet but I'm seeding the iso file.

On the Adobe Reader subject, aren't there X alternatives to it? On Vista, I replaced that memory hog with SumatraPDF; so far, it has had everything I needed and its automatic reloading of modified files is a useful feature. I guess there are open source pdf viewers that would work on FreeBSD?

And Opera on FreeBSD even faster than anything I could have imagined (despite being a long-time user on Windows and Linux on the same machine and the same network...) That's the point I loved the most :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

If Flash support wasn't as important as important as it is, I would suggest OpenBSD for your complaints about ports not compiling. This was also a source of frustration with FreeBSD for me.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: maybe its the license
by Lennie on Tue 8th Mar 2011 11:24 in reply to "RE[4]: maybe its the license"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

The longer I think about it.

I think most poeple don't want to compile, just install binaries with source available when they need it.

What FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, Gentoo do only appeals to a smaller portion of the open source world. Maybe most just want to install it and get to work.

Maybe that is the problem ?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Gone fishing Member since:
2006-02-22

let's consider only FreeBSD, which is the topic we're discussing.


But PCBSD is FreeBSD respun for ease on the desktop. The PCBSD installer even offers to install a standard FreeBSD minus GUI if you wish.

The standard FreeBSD isn't made to be a Desktop - their slogan is "The Power to Serve". FreeBSD is basically a server OS. I've just finished setting up a box and the installer isn't like a ubuntu installer you have to work if you want for example a journalled file system.

I'd say it's less popular because it is a conservative, rather than cutting edge OS that isn't made to attract the masses and there is nothing wrong with that.

You want FreeBSD for the desktop try PCBSD which has as it's first feature a "Fully functional desktop operating system, running FreeBSD 8.x® under the hood."

http://www.pcbsd.org/content/view/12/26/

Edited 2011-03-08 12:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Liquidator Member since:
2007-03-04

I'd say it's less popular because it is a conservative, rather than cutting edge OS that isn't made to attract the masses and there is nothing wrong with that.


I agree 100%.

Reply Parent Score: 0

sakeniwefu Member since:
2008-02-26

I'd say it's less popular because it is a conservative, rather than cutting edge OS that isn't made to attract the masses and there is nothing wrong with that.


Personally I think lack of focus is FreeBSD's main problem. What was their target again?

A free OS? But they have ZFS and other suspiciously licensed stuff.
A server OS? But they only fully support desktop architectures.
A half proprietary desktop os with binary blobs, Linux emulation and Flash? But it doesn't work as well as Linux.
A conservative Unix? But they add many crazy bleeding edge extensions and Linux emulation layers that get dropped after a while.
A secure OS? A fast OS? A build-your-own OS?

They try to be everything for everyone and introduce many cool features and great code but IMHO they ultimately fall short.

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[4]: maybe its the license
by Oliver on Tue 8th Mar 2011 22:56 in reply to "RE[3]: maybe its the license"
Oliver Member since:
2006-07-15

No, we don't need another *buntu. Think about FreeBSD in terms of quality instead of quantity and compare it with distros like Slackware, Gentoo, Debian and to some degree ArchLinux.

Reply Parent Score: 4