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recompiling...uptaking
by fran on Wed 9th Mar 2011 22:12 UTC
fran
Member since:
2010-08-06

bit off topic but while where on the topic linux pc's

intro... article below discussed this need to recompile that applications..

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/jan/05/microsoft-windows-...

If software companies have to sort off recompile their applications to some degree for the ARM platform in two years to support Win8/ARM, might they as well develop it on a crossplatform dev. enviroment...

Recompiling is not rewriting but if you recompile it, can you recompile it for Linux in one dev enviroment?

Maybe an unusual upward spike in Linux support in to three/years...

Reply Score: 3

RE: recompiling...uptaking
by sorpigal on Thu 10th Mar 2011 11:56 in reply to "recompiling...uptaking"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

Recompiling is not rewriting but if you recompile it, can you recompile it for Linux in one dev enviroment?

Chances are no.

It takes an enormous amount of effort to ensure portability when writing code. CPU portability is not so hard if you write in a high level language, to the point where most Windows apps probably just need "a recompile" to run on Windows/ARM. Making your application also work on a totally different OS is a completely different (and huge) challenge for any non-trivial program.

Unless the Windows application was written via a cross-platform toolkit and the developers have already taken care not to introduce any Windowsisms then you will need more than a recompile to make it run on Linux. Even if some care had been taken to be portable chances are that you would have to write *at least* a small amount of code for the "Linux layer" that would necessarily sit under your cross platform code when running on Linux. In all probability most applications would require what amounts to a total rewrite to run on Linux, or would require serious hackery with wine. Both of these things are extremely non-trivial and would not happen for most vendors without some major economic incentive.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: recompiling...uptaking
by vodoomoth on Thu 10th Mar 2011 13:38 in reply to "recompiling...uptaking"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30


Recompiling is not rewriting but if you recompile it, can you recompile it for Linux in one dev enviroment?

Maybe an unusual upward spike in Linux support in to three/years...

Recompiling for Linux would mean either that the application is already based on a crossplatform toolkit/layer, or that the system API calls are portable, which isn't the case. So no, I don't foresee the spike in Linux support. Unless of course, Linux does (in an attempt to generate that spike) add support for the Windows API, I mean directly and not via Wine.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: recompiling...uptaking
by allanregistos on Fri 11th Mar 2011 05:23 in reply to "recompiling...uptaking"
allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10

Recompiling applications to be compatible to specific hardware arch is not a simple thing, and even then, it is almost equivalent to re-writing the application from scratch. The only advantage is that you already have the application logic. You have to consider your target's environment, existing dev libraries, IDEs and support that depends on your application requirements.
That is why, Win8 for Arm will still years to become an accepted platform for developers, methinks.

Reply Parent Score: 1

PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

While switching architectures is non-trivial at the application layer, it's not as bad as you make it sound. Especially once the application has been "broken loose" from its original platform of development. Areas where you might expect trouble are apps that use highly-optimized or machine-specific code for various purposes (audio and video codecs spring to mind, Microsoft Excel is another example actually since it uses an optimized calculation engine), and apps that do complex multi-threading (using exotic synchronization). It's a bigger deal when going for 32 to 64-bit architectures.

Aside from these cases, it really is just a recompile away and some testing and a few targetted bugfixes at issues which were never problems on previous architectures. Switching OSes is a far bigger deal.

Reply Parent Score: 2