Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Mon 14th Mar 2011 08:32 UTC, submitted by Dirge
OSNews, Generic OSes "Right now, someone, somewhere is developing the killer operating system feature of the future - a feature that will change computing and make us wonder how we lived without it. However, the person responsible probably isn't grafting away in the labs of Microsoft, Apple or Red Hat - he or she is more likely to be working in a bedroom or loft. [...] We'll look at the best alternative operating systems, with the potential to change the computing landscape over the next decade."
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avgalen
Member since:
2010-09-23

So of the top 10 of Operating Systems that will bring "the killer operating system feature of the future", there are lots of recreations of old (and sometimes not even succesful) Os's and a couple of concepts that have been "showing great promise" for decades now.

and at first the article is about the killer operating system FEATURE, but it actually seems to be more about the entire OS than one "feature that will change computing and make us wonder how we lived without it".

A nice summary of alternative Operating Systems but nowhere does it mention that killer feature or that one whizkid that is coding it from his bedroom

Meanwhile I am seeing big companies develop and innovate at a crazy pace in the mobile world and I see "autorecovery / selfhealing" being added to the next version of Windows. THAT is what I call I killerfeature (assuming it will work at least half as good as advertised)
Another killerfeature is the linking between the HP devices we have recently seen appear with WebOS
And a phone that you can turn into your desktop computer by docking it might just be a variation of a notebook+dockingstation but it IS a killerfeature in my book

(I personally consider plug-and-play the best killerfeature ever and the big Operating Systems had that first as well)

Reply Score: 4

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I see "autorecovery / selfhealing" being added to the next version of Windows. THAT is what I call I killerfeature (assuming it will work at least half as good as advertised)


ooh.. I remember that being advertised as well... For windows 98 SE. Obviously "it will be better this time", etc, etc. Colour me jaded by repeated failed promises. I wish the guy that installed every version of windows from 1 to win 7 had listed the installation promises that scroll by as it installs. They're pretty much all the same: "Faster Performance", "better hardware support", "More secure", "More stable", "More multimedia capabilities", "Integrated into the web".

I mean they have improved all of those areas ( jury is still out about the continuous performance increase, security was joke for a long time. ), but its just funny seeing them pop up over and over.

Couldn't they just have a stripped down browser and let me surf the web in that space instead of forcing me to read their own marketing BS? Inn fact all Operating systems should do this, I don't even care if its just lynx. Just let me do something with the computer while I wait for the install.

Reply Parent Score: 3

umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

Just let me do something with the computer while I wait for the install.


Great idea ;)

Maybe I'll add an enhancement ticket to let Haiku's installer launch one or two of the included games while the user is waiting for installation to completely.

Technically, these days most Linux installers can run from a LiveCD environment - so you should be able to do what you desire anyway, no?

Reply Parent Score: 3

sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

Just let me do something with the computer while I wait for the install.

Some Linux distros have supported this. I remember SuSE, for example, let you bring up game of solitaire.

These days a web browser is a better idea, if the network has been brought up.

Edited 2011-03-15 10:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

torbenm Member since:
2007-04-23

(I personally consider plug-and-play the best killerfeature ever and the big Operating Systems had that first as well)


Not as far as I recall. The Acorn Archimedes had plu-and-play already in 1987 when it came out. And it was a more real plug-and-play than you see on, say, Windows.

Windows implements plug-and-play by including drivers for all known devices in the OS (so you don't get p&p for new devices, unless these can reuse older drivers). Acorn implemented p&p by requiring devices to carry their own drivers, which they would upload the the computer when they were plugged in. Hence, the OS did not need to include any drivers and would be prepared for any future products.

On the downside, this made devices more expensive, as a device would need to contain a small ROM with its driver and logic for allowing the computer to read it. For a mass-market OS this wouldn't matter much, as device manufacturers would readily do this, but since RISC OS was a niche OS, it meant that the selection of devices was small. Some third-party companies made such devices by adding the extra parts to standard PC devices, but that could easily double the price.

Still, I think this was the right way to do p&p before the Internet became ubiquitous. Now a better way would probably be for the device to contain an IP-address from where the driver can be automatically downloaded. This will allow the driver to be more easily updated.

Reply Parent Score: 2