Linked by Dedoimedo on Thu 17th Mar 2011 23:17 UTC
Debian and its clones Writing about Debian is not a simple thing. You know it's the giant that has spawned pretty much every other distro out there. It's almost like a Roman Empire, almost a taboo. Furthermore, it's not a desktop distro per se. It's more sort of a template you use to build your platform. It's also a SOHO server distro, therefore it more fits into the business category, comparable to CentOS and similar.
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Scientific Linux 6 is already out
by nt_jerkface on Fri 18th Mar 2011 01:03 UTC
nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26

It came out on the 3rd actually.

As for the review...with a laptop you should be plugging it into the router for the install.

Reply Score: 2

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

Like boot times, I often wonder why we care about the amount of steps in setup. Debian isn't for normal users. I like that it gives me more settings up front, and while too many details can overwhelm normal users, Debian is not for normal users.

Setup should only be done once in a blue moon, like every few years, why should we care if it has too many steps?

Reply Parent Score: 7

jack_perry Member since:
2005-07-06

Maybe Debian users don't care, and that's fine. I still remember when Fedora and Ubuntu (? I think) advised the user to wipe their partition before installing a new upgrade. Since they release often, that's supposed to be done relatively frequently, yes? But maybe not Debian.

Either way, I personally prefer having very few steps on a fairly standard system, really as few as possible, and getting a working installation up and running. Lots of unnecessary setup can be done post facto. Many parts can be done by probing the device itself. Writing an installation program, like all good software engineering, is an art form. I like most of the ones I've seen, and I haven't seen Debian so I'm not taking the guy's side. But distros ought to pay a lot of attention to that.

Reply Parent Score: 1

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

I really don't see what the big deal is unless it is targeted at a casual demographic.

I never cared about the FreeBSD installer for the same reason. Sure it could be easier but since it is server focused a competent admin should not be upset about it. There is also plenty of documentation online to answer any questions.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

It came out on the 3rd actually.

As for the review...with a laptop you should be plugging it into the router for the install.


Serious question: Why? Why in today's world where even Windows of all things has out-of-the-box support for virtually every wireless chipset in existence, should we have to plug in a computer that isn't meant to be hardwired in the first place?

I'm sorry but I have to side with the reviewer on this one issue, based on my own positive experience with wireless in Ubuntu, Slackware and Windows 7. Step up, Debian.

Reply Parent Score: 1

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Serious question: Why? Why in today's world where even Windows of all things has out-of-the-box support for virtually every wireless chipset in existence, should we have to plug in a computer that isn't meant to be hardwired in the first place?


Which laptop isn't meant to be hardwired? They all have network adapters.

I don't see any claims or allusions to widespread hardware support out of the box on their website. Debian isn't a consumer product and doesn't pretend to be one. It is Ubuntu that is trying to get on Grandma's desktop and should be judged against Windows. Debian doesn't make false claims about being ready for human beings.

Reply Parent Score: 2

nej_simon Member since:
2011-02-11

Serious question: Why? Why in today's world where even Windows of all things has out-of-the-box support for virtually every wireless chipset in existence ...


Windows has quite good support for wifi-adpaters but it certainly doesn't support "every wireless chipset in existence". Linux has good support as well, at least if you're using some distro like Ubuntu that bundles non-free firmwares and drivers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

Serious answer: Debian supports these wireless chips only via its non-free repository. Since the install discs are linked to the main repository they do not include that support. Debian would be in violation of its foundational documents and principles if it moved the non-free firmware into the main repository. The Deian Developers, and most Debian users, wouldn't stand for it and so it isn't done. Remember that Debian is a democracy controlled by its developers.

Your wireless NIC will work just fine if you configure it post-install and many guides exist on how to do this. Even though it is controversial there are even "unofficial" versions of the install disc which link to non-free and thus support hardware requiring non-free firmware. These are unofficial in that they are not in the official "release" directory and are nominally not supported but are otherwise just like the regular Debain install discs and are, despite being unofficial, distributed by Debian from its servers.

Reply Parent Score: 4

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

if it has a wired NIC port then it's meant to be plugged in to a wired network.

- you'll get faster transfer rates
- you'll get dhcp setup clean
- you'll get better support because wired nic manufacturers didn't make such a mess of the driver/firmware
- you'll get more security during your install since you won't be open to the multitudes of wireless vulnerabilities

(If your wired, I have to get into your home. If your wireless, I have only to get anywhere within range.)

Wireless is fantastic for puttering about the house to any comfy chair you like but it's far from a desirable medium to install over.

(and for the love of Baud people. if your doing support over any form of remote desktop software, have the user plug a wire into the machine cause wifi is dog slow when your spraying screenshots over the network)

Reply Parent Score: 2