Linked by Dedoimedo on Thu 17th Mar 2011 23:17 UTC
Debian and its clones Writing about Debian is not a simple thing. You know it's the giant that has spawned pretty much every other distro out there. It's almost like a Roman Empire, almost a taboo. Furthermore, it's not a desktop distro per se. It's more sort of a template you use to build your platform. It's also a SOHO server distro, therefore it more fits into the business category, comparable to CentOS and similar.
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Morgan
Member since:
2005-06-29

It came out on the 3rd actually.

As for the review...with a laptop you should be plugging it into the router for the install.


Serious question: Why? Why in today's world where even Windows of all things has out-of-the-box support for virtually every wireless chipset in existence, should we have to plug in a computer that isn't meant to be hardwired in the first place?

I'm sorry but I have to side with the reviewer on this one issue, based on my own positive experience with wireless in Ubuntu, Slackware and Windows 7. Step up, Debian.

Reply Parent Score: 1

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Serious question: Why? Why in today's world where even Windows of all things has out-of-the-box support for virtually every wireless chipset in existence, should we have to plug in a computer that isn't meant to be hardwired in the first place?


Which laptop isn't meant to be hardwired? They all have network adapters.

I don't see any claims or allusions to widespread hardware support out of the box on their website. Debian isn't a consumer product and doesn't pretend to be one. It is Ubuntu that is trying to get on Grandma's desktop and should be judged against Windows. Debian doesn't make false claims about being ready for human beings.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Which laptop isn't meant to be hardwired? They all have network adapters.


The network adapter in a laptop is a backup in case a wireless signal is nowhere to be found; they are inherently portable devices that are meant to be used wirelessly. Or do you carry a 300ft CAT-6 cable with your laptop so you can be connected while "mobile"?

I don't see any claims or allusions to widespread hardware support out of the box on their website. Debian isn't a consumer product and doesn't pretend to be one.


Neither does Slackware claim such support, but it's there. It's in the kernel, the same kernel that's in Debian, the same kernel that's in any modern distro. By your logic, Debian shouldn't recognize your USB keyboard, your DVI-based LCD monitor, your SATA controller, indeed any hardware that's not on a PC-XT.

Why is it so hard to admit that Debian Squeeze has some bugs to be fixed? My god, it's a mainstay of Linux and all other F/OSS software that there will always be bugs to be squished, and functionality to improve upon, and so on. Don't get so butthurt because you think someone is picking on your baby OS. The original reviewer was too negative in my opinion, but he was right: Debian Squeeze needed more polish before release, and that's in comparison to its own last version, not just the other distros out there.

To put it another way: It's less capable than the last release. How is that kind of regression not a problem?

Reply Parent Score: 1

nej_simon Member since:
2011-02-11

Serious question: Why? Why in today's world where even Windows of all things has out-of-the-box support for virtually every wireless chipset in existence ...


Windows has quite good support for wifi-adpaters but it certainly doesn't support "every wireless chipset in existence". Linux has good support as well, at least if you're using some distro like Ubuntu that bundles non-free firmwares and drivers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I said "virtually every", and I was referring to Windows 7, the current version ("today's world"). I know even 7 doesn't support ALL hardware but in the past year I've found it to support wireless cards from Atheros, RaLink, Intel, and Broadcom without the need for additional drivers. I think that covers nearly all the major chipset manufacturers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

Serious answer: Debian supports these wireless chips only via its non-free repository. Since the install discs are linked to the main repository they do not include that support. Debian would be in violation of its foundational documents and principles if it moved the non-free firmware into the main repository. The Deian Developers, and most Debian users, wouldn't stand for it and so it isn't done. Remember that Debian is a democracy controlled by its developers.

Your wireless NIC will work just fine if you configure it post-install and many guides exist on how to do this. Even though it is controversial there are even "unofficial" versions of the install disc which link to non-free and thus support hardware requiring non-free firmware. These are unofficial in that they are not in the official "release" directory and are nominally not supported but are otherwise just like the regular Debain install discs and are, despite being unofficial, distributed by Debian from its servers.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Ahhhh!! I am now beating my head against a wall. Are we actually on Slashdot or something? I have repeated several times that my RaLink card, like many Atheros cards, is FULLY SUPPORTED IN THE KERNEL. No firmware blobs needed, no post-install fiddling should be necessary, fully open source drivers already in the kernel. GAH!

Sorry for the caps but no one is listening it seems.

Reply Parent Score: 1

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

if it has a wired NIC port then it's meant to be plugged in to a wired network.

- you'll get faster transfer rates
- you'll get dhcp setup clean
- you'll get better support because wired nic manufacturers didn't make such a mess of the driver/firmware
- you'll get more security during your install since you won't be open to the multitudes of wireless vulnerabilities

(If your wired, I have to get into your home. If your wireless, I have only to get anywhere within range.)

Wireless is fantastic for puttering about the house to any comfy chair you like but it's far from a desirable medium to install over.

(and for the love of Baud people. if your doing support over any form of remote desktop software, have the user plug a wire into the machine cause wifi is dog slow when your spraying screenshots over the network)

Reply Parent Score: 2

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

if it has a wired NIC port then it's meant to be plugged in to a wired network.


No, if it has a wired NIC it can be plugged in but it doesn't have to be. Or do you really suggest people carry around Cat-6 cables with their netbooks and look for a jack at the coffee shop, at the airport, in town square? You do realize what a netbook is for right? It's meant to be wireless, with the NIC as a backup, not the other way around.

Please tell me you are not that utterly stupid, and were just being overly pedantic for argument's sake. Because if you truly are that moronic I'm surprised you can even type.

Reply Parent Score: 2