Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 21st Mar 2011 22:52 UTC, submitted by ephracis
Legal Since competing on merit is looked down upon in the computer and software world, companies in this business usually go for the blindfolded chick with the scale and sword. Up until recently, Microsoft didn't go for the whole patent litigation thing, but now that they've tasted some, they want more. They just sued Barnes & Noble, Foxconn, and Inventec for patent infringement because they use Android.
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RE: Front page
by JAlexoid on Tue 22nd Mar 2011 00:15 UTC in reply to "Front page"
JAlexoid
Member since:
2009-05-19

So how does this DIRECTLY affect you and me? Answer: it doesn't.


Really? You think it does not? How are they going to write off the losses due to the lawsuit? I can't imagine that the investors will be OK in absorbing those costs without increasing margins on some things.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Front page
by tomcat on Tue 22nd Mar 2011 00:18 in reply to "RE: Front page"
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

"So how does this DIRECTLY affect you and me? Answer: it doesn't.
Really? You think it does not? How are they going to write off the losses due to the lawsuit? I can't imagine that the investors will be OK in absorbing those costs without increasing margins on some things. "

To some degree, you're right on that point. IF it's a publicly traded company -- and the ones being sued are -- then they would typically account for these sorts of losses on the balance sheet.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Front page
by WorknMan on Tue 22nd Mar 2011 00:36 in reply to "RE: Front page"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Really? You think it does not? How are they going to write off the losses due to the lawsuit? I can't imagine that the investors will be OK in absorbing those costs without increasing margins on some things.


Well, it's also possible they would raise prices to compensate for a fire in some Chinese factory that destroyed a whole batch of their product, or a thousand other different kind of scenarios that affect their bottom line. Do you really care to know every time something like that happens?

Edited 2011-03-22 00:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Front page
by JAlexoid on Tue 22nd Mar 2011 01:26 in reply to "RE[2]: Front page"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Well, it's also possible they would raise prices to compensate for a fire in some Chinese factory that destroyed a whole batch of their product, or a thousand other different kind of scenarios that affect their bottom line. Do you really care to know every time something like that happens?

Unless insurance companies have policies for IP infringement losses, that is a different issue. I suspect that there is no such insurance policy for IP/patent infringement.

Reply Parent Score: 2