Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 22nd Mar 2011 10:32 UTC
Google And so the story regarding Android supposedly violating the GPL continues. Linus Torvalds has responded to the story in his usual straightforward manner - he thinks it's "totally bogus". In the meantime, Groklaw - not exactly my favourite place but alas, good points are good points - found out that the IP lawyer who started this story, Edward Naughton, used to be a lawyer for Microsoft in dozens of cases, a fact he tried to erase from his online resume.
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Who didn't see this coming?
by bannor99 on Tue 22nd Mar 2011 23:20 UTC
bannor99
Member since:
2005-09-15

"I'm going to fucking kill Google"

Steve "Monkey Boy" Ballmer, 2005

Reply Score: 3

RE: Who didn't see this coming?
by Nth_Man on Wed 23rd Mar 2011 00:24 in reply to "Who didn't see this coming?"
Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16
RE: Who didn't see this coming?
by lemur2 on Wed 23rd Mar 2011 01:13 in reply to "Who didn't see this coming?"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"I'm going to f--king kill Google" Steve "Monkey Boy" Ballmer, 2005


http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-source/microsoft-vs-android/8529?utm...

"This is just one more step in a patent war that’s going–to spread throughout the IT industry. It will be years before it reaches maximum intensity, and years more before the fire begins to die down. Most of this decade will be spent in the fight, which will reduce innovation, destroy tens of billions of dollars in value, and offer a field day to certain non-US competitors. We warned people years ago about this, and now the Free World will be hurt, as everyone will be hurt, by the patent wars resulting from the companies’ incautious embrace of state-issued monopolies on ideas."

There are a great many people totally comitted to stopping Microsoft from being able to collect rent from software which Microsoft didn't write.

The five patents at issue in Microsoft's latest attack against free software are weak enough to possibly make that particular case a reasonable point at which to make a stand. It depends if Barnes & Noble and the others are willing to stand up to Microsoft's ludicrous demands, or if Microsoft offer them a deal to just roll over as HTC did.

After all, Microsoft paid Nokia in order to get Nokia to use WP7. Microsoft probably also offered to help HTC make Apple go away. It is all about Microsoft trying to build a PR case that "free software isn't free". This is a difficult sell for Microsoft because such a stand obviously helps no-one, is very very bad for the economy, and is clearly anti-innovation, anti-competition and anti-trust.

Edited 2011-03-23 01:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

and offer a field day to certain non-US competitors.


As a non-US citizen I say "awesome".

We warned people years ago about this, and now the Free World will be hurt


The "Free World" is much larger than the U.S though and most of isn't all that affected by your in-fighting.

Also. quoting Steven Vaughan-Nichols? Uh....

Reply Parent Score: 3