Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 22nd Mar 2011 23:21 UTC
Google "A federal judge rejected Google's $125 million class-action settlement with authors and publishers, delivering a blow to the company's ambitious plan to build the world's largest digital library and bookstore. Judge Denny Chin of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York said that the settlement went too far in granting Google rights to profit from books without the permission of copyright owners, and that it was 'not fair, adequate and reasonable'." Here is a desk. Please to bang head against it repeatedly until world starts making sense.
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Public domain
by rirmak on Wed 23rd Mar 2011 00:41 UTC
rirmak
Member since:
2009-06-23

This decision is abusive. Nothing should restrict access to public domain.

All books in the public domain must be made available for digitization (i.e. books first published 3-5 years ago or older) with no restriction.

If changing copyright terms from 70-120 years to 3-5 years is not enforced more strictly and universally, such abusive legal rulings will continue to piss us off.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Public domain
by Johann Chua on Wed 23rd Mar 2011 05:30 in reply to "Public domain"
Johann Chua Member since:
2005-07-22

On what planet is copyright only good for 3-5 years?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Public domain
by Morgan on Wed 23rd Mar 2011 17:10 in reply to "RE: Public domain"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Agreed, I've always felt it should be the life of the author, period. After all, once the author is dead, how can she possibly be bothered by her works becoming public domain? Granted, in the event of untimely death this could be bad for the publisher contracted to release the author's works, but since death is the ultimate release from a contract I don't see an issue with it.

I know there is also the question of the author's family and such, but the family didn't write the books (except in rare cases like Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series).

Bottom line, there are a lot of great books out there which remain in limbo, i.e. out of print and the publisher has no intention of reprinting them, but it's still 50 years before they go public domain so no one benefits.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Public domain
by vodoomoth on Thu 24th Mar 2011 12:16 in reply to "Public domain"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30

Judge Denny Chin of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York said that the settlement went too far in granting Google rights to profit from books without the permission of copyright owners, and that it was 'not fair, adequate and reasonable'.

How can you contend this? It might have an unfortunate effect that leads you to saying "Nothing should restrict access to public domain." but it doesn't mean it's "abusive".

Should Google abandon what the judge sees as "profit from books without the permission of copyright owners" the decision would be changed.

Reply Parent Score: 2