Linked by Brooss on Wed 23rd Mar 2011 23:14 UTC
Benchmarks A new set of x264 and vpxenc encoder benchmarks have been published. The new benchmarks address many of the concerns raised in the comments about the methodology used in the previous article, such as using SSIM for quality measurement. Theora is also included in these tests.
Thread beginning with comment 467641
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[6]: Too little too late
by robots on Thu 24th Mar 2011 05:14 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Too little too late"
robots
Member since:
2011-02-15

I believe that even if you let people look at your video for free, if it is a commercial video (e.g. advertising) then you must pay a license if you use h264


Can you provide a source for this?

I can't find any relevant articles via Google search.

Edited 2011-03-24 05:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[7]: Too little too late
by lemur2 on Thu 24th Mar 2011 05:45 in reply to "RE[6]: Too little too late"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"I believe that even if you let people look at your video for free, if it is a commercial video (e.g. advertising) then you must pay a license if you use h264
Can you provide a source for this? I can't find any relevant articles via Google search. "

There is quite a lot of discussion on the web around the fact that the only free use of h264 encoding is for, and I quote direct from the licenses, "ONLY FOR THE PERSONAL AND NON-COMMERCIAL USE OF A CONSUMER".

Backup:
http://bemasc.net/wordpress/2010/02/02/no-you-cant-do-that-with-h26...

http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-20000101-264.html

http://www.betanews.com/article/10-questions-for-MPEG-LA-on-H264/12...

Mozilla putting a video touting the advantages of Firefox 4 on their web pages would NOT constitute "non-commercial use". Not on any day of the week.

This isn't even contentious ... of course one needs a license to use h264 for any kind of commercial use (even if people are allowed to look at ones videos for free).

From the bemasc.net article:

No, you can’t do that with H.264
Posted on 2010/02/02 by Ben
A lot of commercial software comes with H.264 encoders and decoders, and some computers arrive with this software preinstalled. This leads a lot of people to believe that they can legally view and create H.264 videos for whatever purpose they like. Unfortunately for them, it ain’t so.

Maybe the best example comes from the Final Cut Pro license:

To the extent that the Apple Software contains AVC encoding and/or decoding functionality, commercial use of H.264/AVC requires additional licensing and the following provision applies: THE AVC FUNCTIONALITY IN THIS PRODUCT IS LICENSED HEREIN ONLY FOR THE PERSONAL AND NON-COMMERCIAL USE OF A CONSUMER TO (i) ENCODE VIDEO IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE AVC STANDARD (“AVC VIDEO”) AND/OR (ii) DECODE AVC VIDEO THAT WAS ENCODED BY A CONSUMER ENGAGED IN A PERSONAL AND NON-COMMERCIAL ACTIVITY AND/OR AVC VIDEO THAT WAS OBTAINED FROM A VIDEO PROVIDER LICENSED TO PROVIDE AVC VIDEO. INFORMATION REGARDING OTHER USES AND LICENSES MAY BE OBTAINED FROM MPEG LA L.L.C. SEE HTTP://WWW.MPEGLA.COM.

The text could hardly be clearer: you do not have a license for commercial use of H.264. Call it “Final Cut Pro Hobbyist”. Do you post videos on your website that has Google Adwords? Do you edit video on a consulting basis? Do you want to include a video in a package sent to your customers? Do your clients send you video clips as part of your business? Then you’re using the encoder or decoder for commercial purposes, in violation of the license.


Edited 2011-03-24 05:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[7]: Too little too late
by lemur2 on Thu 24th Mar 2011 09:09 in reply to "RE[6]: Too little too late"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"I believe that even if you let people look at your video for free, if it is a commercial video (e.g. advertising) then you must pay a license if you use h264


Can you provide a source for this?

I can't find any relevant articles via Google search.
"

Actually, thinking about this a bit, and putting a lawyer-think hat on for a moment:

http://bemasc.net/wordpress/2010/02/02/no-you-cant-do-that-with-h26...

THE AVC FUNCTIONALITY IN THIS PRODUCT IS LICENSED HEREIN ONLY FOR THE PERSONAL AND NON-COMMERCIAL USE OF A CONSUMER


... I think a lawyer would interpret this phrase as meaning that one's purchase of the program (in this case Final Cut Pro) gives the purchaser a license to use the h264 AVC functionality of program ONLY for uses which are both personal AND non-commercial.

So ... no editing of a video of your amateur basketball team or you local church choir or your school sports day ... such uses would be non-commercial but not personal.

Come to think of it ... putting any video on a social website such as facebook ... public use, not personal. Any use of h264-encoded video on the web at all really (even non-commercial uses) ... is not personal use. You are therefore not licensed.

OTOH, here is a gallery of examples of quality videos for which kind of use everyone IS fully licensed:

http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/video/?video=fx4-whatsnew

Enjoy.

Edited 2011-03-24 09:16 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3