Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 26th Mar 2011 02:00 UTC
Mac OS X When you run smbd -V on your Snow Leopard installation, you'll see it's running SAMBA version 3.0.28a-apple. While I'm not sure how much difference the "-apple" makes, version 3.0.28a is old. Very old. In other words, it's riddled with bugs. Apple hasn't updated SAMBA in 3 years, and for Lion, they're dumping it altogether for something homegrown. The reason? SAMBA is now GPLv3.
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RE[6]: hmmm
by Laurence on Sun 27th Mar 2011 08:10 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: hmmm"
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26



It may be installed by default, but it SMB is not a native file sharing technology of UNIX, NFS and it's like are. SMB is bolted on to the side of Linux, not part of the OS.

You could argue the same for Windows then as it's user space drivers that are optionally (albeit pushed by default) installed along with the other networking stacks.

"Windows File and Print Sharing" services can be stopped and even uninstalled just like the SAMBA daemon can.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: hmmm
by Drantin on Mon 28th Mar 2011 16:25 in reply to "RE[6]: hmmm"
Drantin Member since:
2006-07-10

SMB also doesn't support the file permissions on nearly all file systems used by linux and various unices...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: hmmm
by Laurence on Tue 29th Mar 2011 07:38 in reply to "RE[7]: hmmm"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

SMB also doesn't support the file permissions on nearly all file systems used by linux and various unices...

Well that's not entirely true.
If you're running a SAMBA server and set the host filesystem to read only, then the SMB protocol can't overwrite that (as you would hope to expect). Same goes for owner permissions too. SAMBA also allows me to set the executable permission which isn't present for Windows filesystems.

In fact, SAMBA exposes all of the host filesystem's permissions from user and group to the RWXRWXRWX and special permissions (eg set UID).

Now I couldn't comment whether these permissions were visible in Windows (it wouldn't surprise me if they weren't as they're not native permissions for a Windows filesystem) nor if it native to SMB or whether it's a SAMBA hack, but none the less all the file and folder permissions are there on both my BSD and Linux SMB hosts when viewing with a Linux SAMBA client.

I'd be interested to know if this is just a *nix only SAMBA hack or if there is official support in SMB for other filesystem permissions - and if the latter, if Windows supports them or not (I'm guessing not?).

Reply Parent Score: 2