Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 26th Mar 2011 02:00 UTC
Mac OS X When you run smbd -V on your Snow Leopard installation, you'll see it's running SAMBA version 3.0.28a-apple. While I'm not sure how much difference the "-apple" makes, version 3.0.28a is old. Very old. In other words, it's riddled with bugs. Apple hasn't updated SAMBA in 3 years, and for Lion, they're dumping it altogether for something homegrown. The reason? SAMBA is now GPLv3.
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RE[9]: Comment by Brynet
by danieldk on Sun 27th Mar 2011 17:09 UTC in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by Brynet"
danieldk
Member since:
2005-11-18

Option 4. Vendor X is member of the patent pools like OIN refers Y vendor to go have a polite chat to patent pool. Since other members in the pool are using the same software Vendor Y problem has now got a lot larger.


The OIN patent pool is minuscule (and too scattered) compared of the patent arsenal of the average vendor. Vendor Y doesn't care if vendor X is part of the OIN if the OIN only holds one patent against Y and Y 20 patents against X.

Besides that, OIN also limits counter-measures, since OIN members promise not to assert patents over the 'Linux system'.

If OIN were so effective, why did one of its founding members (Novell) have to make a patent deal with Microsoft? I wouldn't be surprised if some of the other members also have cross-licensing deals with Microsoft over patents that affect e.g. Linux (IBM, Sony?).

Patents litigation can kill small to medium-sized companies. It's often easier to come to some agreement, which is, unfortunately not possible according the GPLv3.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: Comment by Brynet
by oiaohm on Sun 27th Mar 2011 22:47 in reply to "RE[9]: Comment by Brynet"
oiaohm Member since:
2009-05-30

"Option 4. Vendor X is member of the patent pools like OIN refers Y vendor to go have a polite chat to patent pool. Since other members in the pool are using the same software Vendor Y problem has now got a lot larger.


The OIN patent pool is minuscule (and too scattered) compared of the patent arsenal of the average vendor. Vendor Y doesn't care if vendor X is part of the OIN if the OIN only holds one patent against Y and Y 20 patents against X.

Besides that, OIN also limits counter-measures, since OIN members promise not to assert patents over the 'Linux system'.
"
From aggressive stand there is also an agreement in there over 'Linux System' to use there patents defensively.

If OIN were so effective, why did one of its founding members (Novell) have to make a patent deal with Microsoft? I wouldn't be surprised if some of the other members also have cross-licensing deals with Microsoft over patents that affect e.g. Linux (IBM, Sony?).


Please be aware. MS-Novell deal. MS paid Novell large block of cash for usage of Novell patents. A company in money trouble has a large problem saying no to that. Also notice now that Novell is being sold that MS is doing everything it can to get its hands on Novell patents. Also lot of parties are doing everything they can to make sure MS does not. They are high risk weapons to MS. MS was trying to disarm OIN when it did that deal in particular areas.

Also if you watch carefully MS stays well clear of touching Linux. MS will touch closed source Android front ends but you don't see a case against the Android kernel or core.

IBM deal with MS dissolves if anything it has an interest in is attacked by MS. This is the same with every patent deal with IBM. Yes IBM does use Samba. So yes contacting OIN inform IBM that would bring IBM patent pools onto the table. Please be aware IBM is the biggest patent holder in their own right.

The combined pool of OIN is large and unless you have agreement with all members the pool is still huge.

IBM holds patents on most of the electronic means for searching for patent infringement in code. Yes so prove you case in court could bring you in breach of IBM patents.

IBM is not alone in doing agreements on patents this way. Orcale and Redhat also do patent agreements in the model if anything they are using is attacked all bets can be off.

Really I don't get where you get minuscule from. There are of course the odd 1 or 2 patent in key locations OIN cannot help you with. Like Fat long to short file-names.

That limitation is not as limited as it appears. Since OIN hosts a list of projects that are classed key to Linux existence any attack on those projects is classed as an attack against 'Linux System' no matter where.

'Linux system' key applications directly and officially agreed by OIN members does include Samba. So any attack against Samba is an attack against the Linux System no matter the platform its on. Other thing is libreoffice is in that list. Patent trolls go near them at your own risk.

So yes moving away from Samba Apple has given up a patent shield. A very strong and lethal one that MS is trying to disarm.

Reply Parent Score: 2