Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 4th Apr 2011 22:59 UTC
Windows And yes, the stream of controlled Windows 8 leaks continues. This time around, Thurrot and Rivera have published a number of screenshots from Windows 8's brand-new tablet user interface, and surprise surprise, its built on Metro, the same design language that underpins Windows Phone 7. Windows 8 will also include its own PDF reader, Modern Reader, which also happens to be the first application packaged in Microsoft's new AppX format. Update: Long Zheng has some technical details on AppX, including this little tidbit: "The extensive list of properties signifies the comprehensive scope of this system to be the ideal deployment strategy for 'applications', in all essence of the word. In fact, the AppX format is universal enough so it appears to work for everything from native Win32 applications to framework-based applications and even *gasp* web applications. Games are also supported."
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App scalability
by chandler on Mon 4th Apr 2011 23:10 UTC
chandler
Member since:
2006-08-29

That's one fine incentive for developers - write your application, and have it scale from phones to tablets to desktops. Apple already offers something similar, of course, so Microsoft is a tad bit late to the game.

They do? I must have missed a big announcement. Last I checked, you got to write your app once for OS X, and then rewrite the whole UI for iOS using a different framework. Sure, there's a third-party framework in development that will let you use iOS's UIKit APIs on OS X, but even that's not a complete solution, and it's not something offered by Apple.

Windows Phone 7 apps can share much more of their codebase with desktop OSes (Windows *and* Mac) via Silverlight. So Microsoft is already ahead in this area, and providing a common app distribution format will put them firmly in the lead.

Reply Score: 4

RE: App scalability
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 4th Apr 2011 23:15 in reply to "App scalability"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Really? I guess that means I was in the RDF on that one. I thought a lot of code between Mac/iOS was shared, at least to a point where you didn't have to do much porting.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: App scalability
by chandler on Mon 4th Apr 2011 23:25 in reply to "RE: App scalability"
chandler Member since:
2006-08-29

Anything other than the user interface code can be shared, but essentially nobody writes 100% pure MVC code, which means there's a lot of places where things need to be changed when porting from Cocoa to Cocoa Touch. A Foundation-only library can be shared if you've got some unique networking or data processing code, but for a lot of apps, the UI defines and deeply affects the whole structure of the application.

There are issues on Windows Phone 7 with certain base classes not being provided - sockets being a notable example - which can cause complications, but generally if you write to WP7's requirements it'll be easier to share code with a Silverlight app than it is to share between iOS and OS X.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: App scalability
by Stratoukos on Tue 5th Apr 2011 00:07 in reply to "RE: App scalability"
Stratoukos Member since:
2009-02-11

I can't see how this could be possible, regardless of platform or tools.

I simply can't see how one could express a UI in terms that could properly scale up to 1920*1200 or down to 640*320 resolutions. Non-GUI code for OS X is actually pretty close to iOS code (as in extremely close, barring any APIs that are not available on both platforms).

If Microsoft's AppX provides the same level of code sharing, it would be great for developers. If they do find a way to make porting UI code with minimal effort possible, I will be pleasantly surprised.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: App scalability
by avgalen on Tue 5th Apr 2011 04:24 in reply to "RE: App scalability"
avgalen Member since:
2010-09-23

maybe you were confusing applications that were build for iPhone automatically resizing to the iPad. Both of those are on iOS though. Developing "cross-Mac-OS" is far from easy and Apple isn't really interested (yet) in making it easier.

In their opinion everyone should have an iPod for music, an iPad for browsing and playing games on fixed locations, an iPhone for communicating on mobile locations and of course a full blown Mac for doing all of those things and maybe even creating something at home or in the office. All of these devices have different goals, so software only has to be accessible on 1 of them?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: App scalability
by sukru on Mon 4th Apr 2011 23:18 in reply to "App scalability"
sukru Member since:
2006-11-19

Do not forget the Xbox. The XNA framework will work on Windows, Xbox and the WP7 at the same time (and also Zune HD, but it's as good as dead).

I hope this transition does not become another Vista. They're very good (UI-wise) on the desktop right now.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: App scalability
by kaiwai on Tue 5th Apr 2011 09:12 in reply to "App scalability"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

They do? I must have missed a big announcement. Last I checked, you got to write your app once for OS X, and then rewrite the whole UI for iOS using a different framework. Sure, there's a third-party framework in development that will let you use iOS's UIKit APIs on OS X, but even that's not a complete solution, and it's not something offered by Apple.

Windows Phone 7 apps can share much more of their codebase with desktop OSes (Windows *and* Mac) via Silverlight. So Microsoft is already ahead in this area, and providing a common app distribution format will put them firmly in the lead.


Did you actually read what you quoted or did you just choose a random quote to plonk at the top as to make it appear as though you read the article and Thom's take on the matter? the quote is as follows with the part in bold that you should have focused in on:

That's one fine incentive for developers - write your application, and have it scale from phones to tablets to desktops. Apple already offers something similar, of course, so Microsoft is a tad bit late to the game.


What part of 'similar' don't you understand? similar means 'close enough' or 'near to it' or 'not exactly like it'. The appx idea is very similar to what Apple has be it Microsoft making fully portable from top to bottom rather than requiring the front end to be re-written again for a new form factor.

Reply Parent Score: -1