Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 4th Apr 2011 22:59 UTC
Windows And yes, the stream of controlled Windows 8 leaks continues. This time around, Thurrot and Rivera have published a number of screenshots from Windows 8's brand-new tablet user interface, and surprise surprise, its built on Metro, the same design language that underpins Windows Phone 7. Windows 8 will also include its own PDF reader, Modern Reader, which also happens to be the first application packaged in Microsoft's new AppX format. Update: Long Zheng has some technical details on AppX, including this little tidbit: "The extensive list of properties signifies the comprehensive scope of this system to be the ideal deployment strategy for 'applications', in all essence of the word. In fact, the AppX format is universal enough so it appears to work for everything from native Win32 applications to framework-based applications and even *gasp* web applications. Games are also supported."
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RE[7]: Comment by Stratoukos
by bert64 on Tue 5th Apr 2011 09:14 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Stratoukos"
bert64
Member since:
2007-04-23

Businesses may use msoffice, but they use several different versions and compatibility between them can be quite poor for all but the simplest of documents... Someone using openoffice often doesn't even get noticed.

But yes, PDF is the only sensible format if you want to preserve your formatting, and osx/linux actually include far better out of the box support for pdf than anything microsoft has.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[8]: Comment by Stratoukos
by lemur2 on Tue 5th Apr 2011 11:23 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by Stratoukos"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Businesses may use msoffice, but they use several different versions and compatibility between them can be quite poor for all but the simplest of documents... Someone using openoffice often doesn't even get noticed.

But yes, PDF is the only sensible format if you want to preserve your formatting, and osx/linux actually include far better out of the box support for pdf than anything microsoft has.


ODF is also a perfectly sensible format for compatibility between different programs operating on either the same, or different platforms.

The new LibreOffice, for example, is available for a number of desktop systems:
http://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/system-requirements/

and it has excellent interoperability with other Office suites, including MS Office, MS Works and Wordperfect for example.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LibreOffice#Supported_formats

http://www.excitingip.com/1342/why-you-should-implement-libre-offic...

The only Office program in common use that is hopeless at ODF interoperability is MS Office, anything else is fine. Fortunately, there is no reason at all why anyone cannot simply install Libre Office as well as (whatever version) of MS Office on the same machine. If a given machine has an older version of MS Office, installing LibreOffice alongside it would be a significant upgrade for zero cost.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Except, of course, that OpenOffice is one of the most horrible programs ever devised by man, and ever since Office 2007, the gap has only widened. Recommending OpenOffice as a valid alternative to the polished and remarkably speedy Office 2007 or 2010 is incredibly disingenuous.

Not only does OpenOffice have a horrid interface, its .doc compatibility is downright abysmal While that surely is through no fault of their own, it is a fact of life that people have to deal with. In a professional environment, where documents are (sadly) passed around in .doc format, OOo has no place whatsoever.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Which is why most Businesses make sure that everyone is running the same version of office, we only just upgraded to 2003.

Reply Parent Score: 2