Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 5th Apr 2011 22:48 UTC
Google Is Android still open now that Google has postponed the source code release of Honeycomb, version 3.0 of the mobile operating system? I've been reading a whole boatload of articles and blog posts on the web claiming Android is no longer open, but it seems like very few people seem to actually understand what 'open' really means when it comes to the GPL and the Apache license. Here's a short primer.
Thread beginning with comment 469245
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Open... right...
by mrstep on Wed 6th Apr 2011 03:35 UTC in reply to "RE: Open... right..."
mrstep
Member since:
2009-07-18

Oh, open as in 'old source' being open, not the current stuff. Sure, we can stop then - I assume Google will stop being a giant corp beating a "we're not another big giant evil mega-corp" marketing drum too, right?

I think it makes sense for Google to control the platform more tightly - they are becoming Windows Mobile as it is. But then their marketing crap should get tossed. Open as in 'you can contribute' open? Uh, no. Open as in 'we release it and everyone has access' open? Uh, no again. I'd criticize Apple or Microsoft for not being 'open', but then again they never made that sort of claim part of their marketing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Open... right...
by unoengborg on Wed 6th Apr 2011 09:00 in reply to "RE[2]: Open... right..."
unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

Oh, open as in 'old source' being open, not the current stuff.


Android 2.3.3 is the current stuff, for phones. Honeycomb is for tablets. My guess is the Honeycomb was more or less prematurely pushed out the door to some hardware venders to make them ship Android 3.0 devices before iPad2 was out. It could very well be that the code quality not yet is good enough for a general release in an uncontrolled environment.

Another reason for holding back could be to have some leverage against hardware venders that want to modify the platform in a way that makes it harder to integrate phones and tablets.

If we should believe Andy Rubin the code will get released when they have integrated the phone and tablet versions, i.e. in Ice Cream sandwich. In the long run this may not be a bad thing. I think we should wait and see what happens in the future before blaming Google too hard of not being in the FOSS spirit.

Reply Parent Score: 2