Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 6th Apr 2011 17:50 UTC, submitted by Cytor
Gnome The day is finally here, the day that the GNOME team releases GNOME 3.0, the first major revision of the GNOME project since 2002. Little of GNOME 2.x is left in GNOME 3.0, and as such, you could call it GNOME's KDE4. We're living in fortunate times, what, with two wildly divergent open source desktops.
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RE[7]: Sigh...
by kaiwai on Thu 7th Apr 2011 06:33 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Sigh..."
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

I didn't say that *all* Mac users actually *are* computer-illiterate--I implied that those are the people Apple primarily markets to.


Microsoft does that too but they bank on their entrenchment within the enterprise to carry them through into the consumer desktop - "gotta have at home what I have at work" is the mentality of so many who would consider an alternative but believe if it isn't the same as work then all hell will break loose.

Obviously there are exceptions (when aren't there?), and different types of people get Macs (Leo Laporte likes them, and he's certainly not computer-illiterate), but you can't deny that Apple tries its hardest to dumb things down and make a walled garden where things get done *their* way or not at all, all in an effort to make it as "user-friendly" as possible.


What is so bad about the AppStore - you can install load applications on your computer today and into the future without relying on it (no, I don't indulge in the fantasies 1984 like conspiracies that Apple will turn it into an iOS device) and I like the fact that with the AppStore they tell developers that they're not allowed to use private API's or rely on external libraries that are not bundled with their applications. Far too often I've had applications break because some dim bulb at said software company thought it would be cool to use a private API because they were too lazy to implement said functionality themselves. If it means that the AppStore forces software companies to bundle everything they need in a self contained application then I'd sooner have that than the mess that exists- especially when it comes to Adobe and their ability to sprawl shit from one end of the hard disk another (the only thing worse than the uninstaller from Adobe is one from Symantec to uninstall Norton Anti-Virus).

If I were to brew a craft beer and advertise it with rainbow-colored zebras, I'm sure some male beer connoisseurs would try it too, not just the women its advertising material (including logos) might be expected to attract. Just look at Delirium Tremens with its pink elephants (case in point: I need to try that one...).


*shrugs* But I'm sure the vast majority would buy one and keep buying one if it tasted good - no one would keep purchasing a beer that tastes horrible if the only satisfaction is viewing the logo on the front. In the case of the Mac the 'look' might pull in the customer but something has to keep them there beyond just 'teh shiny' and Apple knows that if their product isn't up to what customers demand then they'll simply decide to go with another vendor. Those people tell others of their negative experience and their over all sales drop. If we were talking about 'mindless purchasing' then common sense would dictate that the path of least resistance (purchase a Windows computer) would have the largest number of informed people due to their non-interest in any alternatives ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Sigh...
by UltraZelda64 on Thu 7th Apr 2011 07:07 in reply to "RE[7]: Sigh..."
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

*shrugs* But I'm sure the vast majority would buy one and keep buying one if it tasted good - no one would keep purchasing a beer that tastes horrible if the only satisfaction is viewing the logo on the front.

I can't really argue with the points you brought up in your previous article, except the above. Marketing sells... that's what it's there for. I don't know what country you're in, but here just one look at what beers people drink might make you gag. Bud Light, Budweiser, Miller Lite, Coors, Coors Light. Advertising does sell.

My cousin, a Bud Light drinker, thinks I'm nuts because I don't drink the "normal" stuff and I pour in a glass at a higher than almost-freezing temperature instead of drinking straight from the bottle, ice cold out of the fridge. Most people wouldn't know a good beer if it hit them in the head... hell, my uncle used to drink Busch every day, until the doctor told him to stay away from alcohol and he started drinking Busch NA. Advertising and image is everything, and Apple knows that.

I might drop down and get a 30-pack of Pabst Blue Ribbon or Genessee myself if I'm broke and care more about the alcohol and getting drunk/lots of beer than anything else. At least those tend to taste decent when slightly warmer and poured into a glass... I'll never attempt another Bud Light out of a glass again though. But this is getting off-topic now, heh... I'm done.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Sigh...
by kaiwai on Thu 7th Apr 2011 07:46 in reply to "RE[8]: Sigh..."
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I can't really argue with the points you brought up in your previous article, except the above. Marketing sells... that's what it's there for. I don't know what country you're in, but here just one look at what beers people drink might make you gag. Bud Light, Budweiser, Miller Lite, Coors, Coors Light. Advertising does sell.


Very true; I guess the whole purpose of marketing is to sell 'image' that people can 'buy into' when they purchase a particular product in much the same way that Marlboro Cigarettes banks itself on the whole 'lone cowboy' image. iPod has got that 'cool' image but I'm really surprised there hasn't been some sort of backlash against it for being 'too mainstream'. Some how Apple seems to maintain its 'street cred' where most products once they hit a peak stop getting the amount of attention (via the media) that they used to as people move onto the next 'must have' thing.

When I was in Australia I was always confused me why people would ever want to drink VB (Victoria Bitter) when it tasted absolutely crap and Cascade Light was a far nicer brew but had less visibility in the market. Then again with VB they had a huge presence when it came to sponsorship and marketing even though their product has been consistently crap since it first appeared on the market.

My cousin, a Bud Light drinker, thinks I'm nuts because I don't drink the "normal" stuff and I pour in a glass at a higher than almost-freezing temperature instead of drinking straight from the bottle, ice cold out of the fridge. Most people wouldn't know a good beer if it hit them in the head... hell, my uncle used to drink Busch every day, until the doctor told him to stay away from alcohol and he started drinking Busch NA. Advertising and image is everything, and Apple knows that.

I might drop down and get a 30-pack of Pabst Blue Ribbon or Genessee myself if I'm broke and care more about the alcohol and getting drunk/lots of beer than anything else. At least those tend to taste decent when slightly warmer and poured into a glass... I'll never attempt another Bud Light out of a glass again though. But this is getting off-topic now, heh... I'm done.


I used to drink beer but found that I used to get sleepy so now I just stick to wine. When I first started on wine, interesting enough, I started on my reds and worked my way to the whites where as most people start on their whites and work their way to their reds. First red was a Church Road Cabernet Sauvignon but these days I tend to hover around a good Aussie Shiraz or New Zealand Syrah when having venison but an Otago Pinot Noir does the trick but it really doesn't marry up with the gamey nature of venison. If I have a curry I'll go for a Riesling, Gewurztraminer or a Pinot Gris - the nature of the wine compliments the underlying sweetness that many of the curries have - especially the tomato based curries.

Reply Parent Score: 2