Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 10th Apr 2011 19:57 UTC, submitted by PLan
Legal Should I be sad or relieved? Groklaw, the website that played a central role in the SCO vs. sanity case, has just announced it will close up shop on May 16 of this year. Groklaw's place in history has been secured, surely, but in recent years, the site became more and more like a relic from the past, clearly stuck in the everyone vs. Microsoft mindset of the late '90s and early 2000s. Even in today's announcement post, Groklaw shows that its time has indeed come.
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nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26

The US market is actually still a very small market, although it has been catching up to the rest of the world recently, it is still lagging behind.


The US is the largest smartphone market. I'm not sure how you would view it as "very small" in any context.

Microsoft has been trying to enter the mobile market for almost a decade (long before the video game market) and failed, long before Android or iOS even existed.


Since when does having a small market share equate failure?

Reply Parent Score: 2

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23


The US is the largest smartphone market. I'm not sure how you would view it as "very small" in any context.

Not by a long shot.

Reply Parent Score: 4

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Do you just make stuff up and assume everyone does the same?

Indeed, the US market - which grew an impressive 41% year on year - is currently the largest smartphone market in the world, with 14.7 million units accounting for 23% of total global shipments in Q2 2010.
http://www.tgdaily.com/mobility-features/50907-android-smartphone-s...

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

The US is the largest smartphone market.


Depends on how you define your markets. For example, while individual countries in Europe (or Asia) may not constitute bigger markets the region as whole may do.

Since when does having a small market share equate failure?


Depends on what argument you're trying to make. A common argument seems to be that Linux on the desktop is a failure due to small market share.

Reply Parent Score: 4

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Depends on how you define your markets.


23% of the global market negates his statement by any definition.

Depends on what argument you're trying to make. A common argument seems to be that Linux on the desktop is a failure due to small market share.


It failed at mainstream success. It's always had success as a hobbyist system.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, windows mobile certainly was not a success on the scale of the iphone, android,blackberry, or symbian. I can't imagine Microsoft's goal with their smart-phones was to be bad enough to be dropped when presented with a choice of a phone with any other operating system. So, yeah I'd consider it to be a failure.

It would be interesting to see some inside numbers on the profitability of the phone OS from 2002 to today. I can't imagine it was very profitable. It also didn't appear to give them any kind of head start in the smart phone market. It really does look like a wasted effort.

Reply Parent Score: 3