Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 14th Apr 2011 21:41 UTC
Internet & Networking A major win has been scored in Europe against the content industry and several governments who are trying to impose censorship on the internet through ISPs. The European Court of Justice, the highest court in Europe, gave a preliminary opinion which states that no ISP can be forced to filter the internet, especially not enforce copyright.
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Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

Europe can't outlaw filtering in countries outside europe, obviously, so what would be the point? We cant make laws for other countries and saying "we have decided that doing what you're doing in your country is unlawful". It's like, say, Sweden would decide to outlaw filtering in the U.S. It's pointless and arrogant.
As I understand it this new "directive" (or whatever) would also apply to government forced filtering.
Now, officially condemning something that is happening somewhere else is an entirely different matter.

Reply Parent Score: 5

smitty Member since:
2005-10-13

As I understand it this new "directive" (or whatever) would also apply to government forced filtering.

If the government merely instructed ISPs to do this, I think it would, but the ruling clearly states that legislators can enact laws forcing censorship. It just says that currently those laws don't exist and the copyright industry can't sue ISPs unless they do.

Essentially, they've moved the fight out of the lawyers hands and into the legislature. Money talks there as well, but they'll have to bribe a lot of people to enact these laws with no guarantee of success. As opposed to the current tactic which is to pay lawyers a bunch of money and threaten to sue everyone. So it is a big win.

Edited 2011-04-15 05:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

Well, the Danish legislators cannot legally enact laws forcing censorship, since the Danish constitution strictly prohibits any kind of censurship and other preventive measures in regard to information exchange.

Reply Parent Score: 2

mistersoft Member since:
2011-01-05

Europe can't outlaw filtering in countries outside europe, obviously, so what would be the point?.


(1) For ourselves!!

(2) It makes it a lot harder for other countries(i.e. the U.S.) to 'fool' their own electorate into accepting practices that would be or going in the direction of being - a lot more draconian, less free in several ways, and more 'nanny state'{that's being polite} than what would be the new norm over the pond in Europe!

Reply Parent Score: 1