Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th Apr 2011 21:27 UTC
Features, Office Over the weekend, Oracle basically announced its defeat in the competition with the community-created fork of OpenOffice, LibreOffice. Oracle will cease all commercial development of OpenOffice, and will turn it into a purely community-based project.
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umccullough
Member since:
2006-01-26

The individual that you save $100 today might one day use OpenOffice to send in a resume that looks garbled to the employer.


People still send resumes as .doc? I thought most saved them as PDF these days.

Reply Parent Score: 10

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Some vote of confidence that is. Just don't send your resume as a doc file!

I can't even personally recommended Foxit anymore because I have seen what the 1% cases look like. Yes it is fine 99% of the time but the 1% can really ruin someone's day.

Maybe we need more neutral formats but that is irrelevant to what I will personally endorse.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Most people in my country do.

I actually send mine as RTF which is associated with Word and works with most office formats.

Reply Parent Score: 2

abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

"The individual that you save $100 today might one day use OpenOffice to send in a resume that looks garbled to the employer.


People still send resumes as .doc? I thought most saved them as PDF these days.
"

Good luck with that. For two years before I was hired at my current job back in September I was sending out PDF resumes and the most common response I got back was "Can you send it to me in word?". Somehow people prefer to use an expensive, proprietary piece of software just to read a brain dead proprietary format instead of reading an open format with various FREE readers. I just don't get it but it's true.

Reply Parent Score: 4

shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

The reason for wanting .doc Cv's is that many agencies then reformat it and wrap it in their corporate branding before sending out to companies.

I've seen the same CV in at least four different formats recently. The text was the same (including the mistakes (sigh)) but the 'branding' was very different.
One agency's 'stuff' was so intrusive it turned a two page Cv into a 5 page one. Needless to say we didn't use them. IMHO, that goes too far and is much like the Ad riddled web sites we see so commonly these days.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

People still send resumes as .doc? I thought most saved them as PDF these days.

This is actually a sore point for me.

I've been recently hunting for a new IT job in the UK. Every single (bar one) agency and prospective employer has asked me to convert my PDF CV to a MS Word DOC format.

In fact some job sites only offer .DOC, .RTF and .TXT extensions for attaching / uploading a CV. I mean, who in their right mind thinks a raw ASCII text file is better than a PDF which -as the name explicitly states- is designed to be a standard way for sending formatted portable documents.

To say I was irritated by this idiotic request from IT recruiters and job sites would be putting it mildly.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Weird. I always send my cv as pdf, and nobody ever cared. I also always send my invoices as pdf, if only because it means the payer can't mess with the contents.

Reply Parent Score: 1

bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

If you don't send as .doc I can tell you that most places will round file your resume since the HR pre screening software usually doesn't work on PDF. Oh and I have personally seen a student lose a full 20 points on a paper (dropping them from a B to an F) for using Open Office which turned their paper into word salad on the teacher's Office 2K3.

Whether you like it or not there is a reason why most stick with MS Office, and that is compatibility. I'm sure the FOSS guys will make some claim about Office 2K docs getting mangled in 2K10 (although frankly I have NEVER seen this, and I've dealt with multiMb docs with tons of formatting) but compared to the word salad that OO.o can spit out it really is like night and day.

In the end it is Linux all over. if you have time to learn it AND fiddle with it AND deal with its quirks AND don't need to worry about getting round filed or dinged by incompatibility? The OO.o is for you. I personally give it out to home users since little Billy doing a book report is gonna print it anyway. but in business? Good way to make sure you don't get called for that job, or get that contract signed, etc. Having your doc come out as word salad is the surest way to look Mickey Mouse in business, and appearances matter.

Reply Parent Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

If you don't send as .doc I can tell you that most places will round file your resume since the HR pre screening software usually doesn't work on PDF. Oh and I have personally seen a student lose a full 20 points on a paper (dropping them from a B to an F) for using Open Office which turned their paper into word salad on the teacher's Office 2K3. Whether you like it or not there is a reason why most stick with MS Office, and that is compatibility. I'm sure the FOSS guys will make some claim about Office 2K docs getting mangled in 2K10 (although frankly I have NEVER seen this, and I've dealt with multiMb docs with tons of formatting) but compared to the word salad that OO.o can spit out it really is like night and day. In the end it is Linux all over. if you have time to learn it AND fiddle with it AND deal with its quirks AND don't need to worry about getting round filed or dinged by incompatibility? The OO.o is for you. I personally give it out to home users since little Billy doing a book report is gonna print it anyway. but in business? Good way to make sure you don't get called for that job, or get that contract signed, etc. Having your doc come out as word salad is the surest way to look Mickey Mouse in business, and appearances matter.


The fact that MS Office mangles incoming documents is an anti-feature of MS Office, not a reason to use it.

When your homewrok assignment is done, click on the "PDF" icon in the toolbar of LibreOffice and send the resulting PDF file to your teacher. If the teacher cannot read it, complain and complain until you get him/her fired, as your teacher is incompetent.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Dave_K Member since:
2005-11-16

In my experience, in the UK at least, many companies put out their job application forms in .doc format. These are generally pretty complex documents, with embedded images and text boxes/tables to split up the questions. I've yet to see one that opens correctly in OpenOffice; they're often so mangled after conversion that text is lost completely, and all look unprofessional with messed up formatting.

It's a problem when submitting any OpenOffice document to someone using MS Office. You don't know how the OpenOffice document will turn out when they open it, you can't be there to reformat it and fix the glitches yourself, and they’ll assume that it's you who messed it up.

This is the reason why most of the charities I deal with buy MS Office rather than using free software. They regularly communicate with the government and other organisations using MS Office, and those communications can be very important and time sensitive. It isn't worth losing out on tens of thousands of pounds in funding because an important application created in OpenOffice was reduced to gibberish.

For the price of MS Office, using OpenOffice often just isn't worth the hassle.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

This is the reason why most of the charities I deal with buy MS Office rather than using free software. They regularly communicate with the government and other organisations using MS Office, and those communications can be very important and time sensitive. It isn't worth losing out on tens of thousands of pounds in funding because an important application created in OpenOffice was reduced to gibberish.

For the price of MS Office, using OpenOffice often just isn't worth the hassle.


The UK government has recently set a procurement policy that mandates "open standards", and the UK government has defined "open standards" as meaning "royalty free".

http://www.consortiuminfo.org/standardsblog/article.php?story=20110...

MS Office is absolutely abysmal at handling the OpenDocument (ODF) open standard, and it doesn't handle at all the recently-approved ODF 1.2 open standard for digital documents.

http://www.robweir.com/blog/2011/03/odf-1-2-committee-specification...

Considering that MS office won't be at all capable to meet the UK government's announced procurement needs, using it in the future to try to interact with the UK government soon won't be worth the hassle.

If I were you I'd look at reversing your advice to charities.

Edited 2011-04-20 14:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

[qPeople still send resumes as .doc? I thought most saved them as PDF these days. [/q]

Sadly .doc still has to be used. A good majority of employers, even in the IT industry, demand the resume in .doc format. If sent in as a pdf, it will be ignored since they specifically require .doc.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"People still send resumes as .doc? I thought most saved them as PDF these days.


Sadly .doc still has to be used. A good majority of employers, even in the IT industry, demand the resume in .doc format. If sent in as a pdf, it will be ignored since they specifically require .doc.
"

Incompetence on the part of IT industry then? Sigh!

Is America already really this much in decline?

Reply Parent Score: 2