Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th Apr 2011 21:27 UTC
Features, Office Over the weekend, Oracle basically announced its defeat in the competition with the community-created fork of OpenOffice, LibreOffice. Oracle will cease all commercial development of OpenOffice, and will turn it into a purely community-based project.
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SamuraiCrow
Member since:
2005-11-19

Not only do I send PDF files as my resume's, I have been able to print out Word documents in DOCX format on a Windows machine without Microsoft Office installed on it. Microsoft supplies a Word Viewer program for free that can be upgraded to support all Word formats. It, like PowerPoint Viewer, is sufficient for my office needs in conjunction with LibreOffice and OO.o.

I only wish more Microsoft Office users would download the free plugin to load and save ISO standard OpenDocument file formats instead of the only partially disclosed OOXML file formats. One thing that always has gotten my goat about Microsoft is the way they scuttle industry standards with proprietary products that deliver only equivalent results. OpenGL and DirectX suffer the same problem. I'm happy with both my Mac and Linux machines and hope I never need to shell out the big bucks for either Microsoft Office or Windows ever again.

Reply Parent Score: 6

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

You're not telling me anything new and you probably assume I like MS Office as much as you like OpenOffice.

In reality I don't like any modern office suite. They all annoy me.

The issue is that I couldn't recommended OpenOffice to a student knowing full well he might one day run into the 1% problem, regardless of whether I tell him to send resumes in PDF and also follow instructions x y and z. People can be told instructions and then later ignore them.

Promoting alternatives on the internet is fine and good but I'm not going to put my name on them in real life. I've done that before and got burned. OpenOffice does not guarantee 100% compatibility with DOC or DOCX. I came across a OO forum before where an OpenOffice user was told by an admin to buy MS Office after his paper was scrambled. You want to do personal advocacy, that's fine. I'm just explaining my position which is based on real world experience.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

You're not telling me anything new and you probably assume I like MS Office as much as you like OpenOffice. In reality I don't like any modern office suite. They all annoy me. The issue is that I couldn't recommended OpenOffice to a student knowing full well he might one day run into the 1% problem, regardless of whether I tell him to send resumes in PDF and also follow instructions x y and z. People can be told instructions and then later ignore them. Promoting alternatives on the internet is fine and good but I'm not going to put my name on them in real life. I've done that before and got burned. OpenOffice does not guarantee 100% compatibility with DOC or DOCX. I came across a OO forum before where an OpenOffice user was told by an admin to buy MS Office after his paper was scrambled. You want to do personal advocacy, that's fine. I'm just explaining my position which is based on real world experience.


If you use the "file open" command in LibreOffice, and pull down the list of supported formats, you can count one hundred and fifteen different file formats supported.

MS Office can't open more than 10% of those, let alone guarantee 100% compatibility. Legacy versions of MS Office also does not guarantee 100% compatibility with DOC or DOCX.

If you were serious and truthful with your recommendations, you would tell people that they are far more likely to have success opening a variety of files with LibreOffice than with Microsoft Office.

MS Office does not support any approved standard format (including ODF, which it makes an utter mess of). docx is NOT the approved OOXML standard.

Edited 2011-04-19 03:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

The issue is that I couldn't recommended OpenOffice to a student knowing full well he might one day run into the 1% problem, regardless of whether I tell him to send resumes in PDF and also follow instructions x y and z. People can be told instructions and then later ignore them.


If they send their resume with the latest version of MS Office and the potential employer is still on an older version, the document format with be garbled anyway. Using MS Office is nowhere near a 100% guarantee for compatibility (which goes to show the sorry state of current office suites, even without going out of a single vendor products).

The only sensible advice is sending the resume as PDF (which at least LibreOffice can export to out of the box).

Reply Parent Score: 7

lydgate Member since:
2006-12-30

Agreed, Office suites are annoying, I gave them up about five years ago (and yes, I do work in an office, I just use antiword or xl2html to view other people's documents, except in extreme cases when I use a Windows VM).

I used MS Office for maybe 5 or 6 years, then Open Office for a few, then switched totally to text for myself and LaTeX if I needed to send a document out. I wrote humanities papers, a thesis, and a dissertation in LaTeX and they came out looking better than anything I'd ever produced in any office suite. My CV is also in LaTeX and looks great. May not be for everyone but there are alternatives, it's not only OO vs MS.

Reply Parent Score: 1

fmaxwell Member since:
2005-11-13

OpenOffice does not guarantee 100% compatibility with DOC or DOCX.


And neither does Microsoft Office.

In fact, there are cases where OpenOffice will properly format an older Microsoft Word document when the current version of Microsoft Office will format that same document incorrectly.

Your entire argument in favor of Microsoft Office is FUD-based -- Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt. "What if you send a resume to someone and it looks garbled?" Oh no! Someone might have to ask me to resend it in a different format, like PDF or RTF. They can reply to my e-mail with something like "Dear Moron Who Sends Resumes As Proprietary Word Processor Files..."

I am a Windows and Mac user who owns copies of Microsoft Office for the both platforms. It is no longer installed on my systems. I use NeoOffice on the Macs and LibreOffice and OpenOffice on the PCs. My work, and my computers, are too important to entrust to Microsoft's undocumented product activation schemes.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I just reinstalled Office, compelte uninstall, reboot and reinstall. This is the second time this week. It seems MS Office on my VP's workstation randomly decides it doesn't read it's own Powepoint files. The files are fine when opened on another machine.

So, a 1% issue with Open Office is a problem but a 1% issue with MS Office is all good then I guess.

(edit): another fun one
Open Office likes to specify the tab name even when it's a cell formula on the local worksheet. This makes sense, an absolute path can point to a cell in the curent sheet or any of the other sheets (tabs).

Excel can't handle this. If a cell formula speicfies a sheet name, it must be a different sheet than teh current one. Why can't Excel manage this very simple thing? Why must I then edit the cell formulas back to relative paths just so Excel can can calulate the resulting cell value? If MS Office is the best everzez; why can't it deal with absolute paths in addition to relative paths in cell formulas pointing back to the there own worksheet?

Edited 2011-04-19 19:41 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I only wish more Microsoft Office users would download the free plugin to load and save ISO standard OpenDocument file formats instead of the only partially disclosed OOXML file formats. One thing that always has gotten my goat about Microsoft is the way they scuttle industry standards with proprietary products that deliver only equivalent results. OpenGL and DirectX suffer the same problem. I'm happy with both my Mac and Linux machines and hope I never need to shell out the big bucks for either Microsoft Office or Windows ever again.


It is a de jure standard ... which in the real world doesn't mean a lot. De facto standards are the ones that count.

Reply Parent Score: 1