Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 29th Apr 2011 22:06 UTC, submitted by sjvn
SuSE, openSUSE Attachmate now owns Novell and therefore, by extension, also owns SUSE and openSUSE. With Oracle currently doing everything in its power to thoroughly destroy what's left of Sun's open source commitments, scepticism abound about the future of SUSE, and more specifically of openSUSE. Attachmate's CEO has answered some questions about the future of SUSE and openSUSE, and as far as words go, it's looking good.
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RE[6]: As far as words go....
by Slambert666 on Sun 1st May 2011 10:52 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: As far as words go...."
Slambert666
Member since:
2008-10-30

When it comes to web techs. PHP is Number 1. Java is Number 2. And .net is tail of the hunt. Both Java and PHP has lot of premade applications to get you going with.


Do you have a link that supports that statement or are you just making those numbers up?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I actually saw figures supporting this just the other week while looking at different web app frameworks. Can't remember where though but you don't have to be a genius to know that PHP is the most widely deployed one and that .Net isn't even on the map when it comes to public, high-volume sites. It's a good guess that Ruby On Rails is more popular than .net too.
Could be different for Intranet stuff but Java is pretty entrenched there so it might be a toss-up.

The only .net web app of any stature that I can recall right away is Dekiwiki.

Edited 2011-05-01 11:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

I actually saw figures supporting this just the other week while looking at different web app frameworks. Can't remember where though but you don't have to be a genius to know that PHP is the most widely deployed one and that


PHP might be the most widely deployed Web framework, but when you are saying that, you are including things like say, Mom and Pop's Diner, which consists of 5 pages. Maybe a dynamic menu, and an email contact form. The vast majority of mission critical enterprise Web applications are written in either Java, or .NET. (Think e-bay, your bank's online banking Web site, online stock trading, etc).

The vast majority of PHP users are irrelevant when comes to business strategy planning at Red Hat or Novell. That's because most PHP shops are very small, and don't purchase support contracts (either because they can't afford them, downtime doesn't cost them very much, or their applications and OS use cases are simple enough where problems they can't solve on their own are unlikely to crop up). Because of that, Red Hat and Novell can't make any money off of them. But given the types of sites that are built on Java and .NET (stock trading, auction sites, etc.) these companies can lose hundreds of thousands, or even millions of dollars a minute when their site is down. For these types of users, running without a guaranteed 24/7 instant phone access to support contact is not an option. And that's where Red Hat and IBM make their money.

.Net isn't even on the map when it comes to public, high-volume sites. It's a good guess that Ruby On Rails is more popular than .net too.



Well, Dice.com has 7 times as many Job openings for .NET developers as it does for Ruby developers. So I think it's a good guess that you are wrong about that. Anytime you are doing more than a simple CRUD app (and admitidly, probably 90% of small Web Sites out there are simple CRUD apps), the magic of Ruby on Rails disappears, and perhaps even starts to become a liability over time. Ruby on Rails still hasn't really gotten any traction in large scale environments (and I'm not really sure PHP has either.)

The only .net web app of any stature that I can recall right away is Dekiwiki.


Well, if you've ever ordered anything from Barnes and Noble online, you've used .NET. If you've ever ordered a computer online from Dell, you've also used .NET. And of course, Hotmail (or Live Mail, or whatever they call it these days) is built on .NET).

When you consider "applications" of stature, you need to considering vertical market applications that power billions of dollars of financial transactions every day. There's a good chance you use these applications on a daily basis without even realizing it, either directly or indirectly (if you visit an ATM, there's a good chance the back end software that handles your transaction is a service written in either .NET or Java, for example). A lot of times, Java and .NET don't appear as popular as PHP because it's an "out of sight, out of mind" kind of thing. People just aren't aware of how much both of these technologies impact their lives because they don't see them running behind the scenes.

Also, believe it or not, most of MIT's applications are built in .NET.

Edited 2011-05-01 15:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2