Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 29th Apr 2011 22:06 UTC, submitted by sjvn
SuSE, openSUSE Attachmate now owns Novell and therefore, by extension, also owns SUSE and openSUSE. With Oracle currently doing everything in its power to thoroughly destroy what's left of Sun's open source commitments, scepticism abound about the future of SUSE, and more specifically of openSUSE. Attachmate's CEO has answered some questions about the future of SUSE and openSUSE, and as far as words go, it's looking good.
Thread beginning with comment 471576
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[8]: As far as words go....
by TemporalBeing on Mon 2nd May 2011 22:41 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: As far as words go...."
TemporalBeing
Member since:
2007-08-22

Ok, so SP2 came out when? 2004.
SP3 came out in 2008, that meant Novell had 4 years to build a stable Client for Windows, and they couldn't do it. They had 3 years before that. They've had 3 years since and the Novell Client for XP still sucks.

Argue all you want, but they haven't changed it enough that it explains Novell's incompetence. once in 11 years (XP) is not a valid excuse.

Vista came out in 2006, and they haven't got it. Windows 7 came out 2 years ago, still haven't got it stable.

so that's 7 years for Xp to XP SP2, 3 years for SP3, 5 years for Vista and 2 for Win7.

Admit it, Novell sucks.


FYI - you're just looking at the known public updates to the API. Remember, there is also the Windows Update mechanism too and Microsoft does push a lot of updates out through there that they do not publicize. So as to subtle changes that can break a lot of things like eDirectory there is more than ample opportunity for ways in which Microsoft has been known to use to break GSSAPI on Novell.

Now, you could argue that some of those changes were not intentional as Microsoft does not have a very good track record of pushing out patches via Windows Update that always keeps a fix in place. All to often one patch will undo another patch, and they'll repatch in a third patch. (Several public examples of this throughout Microsoft's history - e.g. WMF security flaws).

So whether it was intentional or not, it has likely happened in ways that Novell or anyone other than Microsoft (and in some cases even Microsoft) can account for in order to release a stable add-on product - which is what eDirectory/GroupWise is for Windows.

This is not a matter of making excuses for Novell. It is a matter of simply pointing out the history and behavior of Microsoft - known anti-competitive behavior at that.

Reply Parent Score: 2

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

Oh my god, can you make any more excuses? Novell has done a horrible job, the client sucks. It's slow, it's fickle, it just sucks.

Show me evidence, not tinfoil hats and conspiracy theories. Novell lost, and it's their fault. They let NT and AD eat their lunch, and really poor quality software was a big part of the problem.

Reply Parent Score: 2

TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

Oh my god, can you make any more excuses? Novell has done a horrible job, the client sucks. It's slow, it's fickle, it just sucks.

Show me evidence, not tinfoil hats and conspiracy theories. Novell lost, and it's their fault. They let NT and AD eat their lunch, and really poor quality software was a big part of the problem.


Obviously you are not any where near aware of Microsoft's standard practice of operation. Nothing I have said is conspiracy theory/etc; but the same tactics Microsoft has used against numerous competitors from Netware to WordPerfect, and numerous others. The Antitrust trials in the US and EU slowed them down, but still did not stop the behavior - just made them try to hide it harder, and use some projects (IE) to faint improval. Yet, their tactics with WP7, SCOG (yes, they've been publically related to the SCOG efforts), and against Novell (of late - via CPTN and Attachment) are just the latest examples.

But them, you probably won't both to go read all the condemning documents provided by the Comes v. Microsoft trial (http://www.groklaw.net/staticpages/index.php?page=2007021720190018) either.

No, Microsoft won't ever change because all those practices are too ingrained in their culture. To change, they'd have to get rid of probably every manager for the first 3 or 4 tiers of management - which would just completely destroy the company. Replacing Ballmer would help, but his lieutenants would probably keep it up and subvert anyone who takes his place from trying to actually change - it's just how they've been bread in the organization.

So please, go learn about Microsoft and how the really do business; why they are in the position they are in; and why most (like yourself) don't think there are better products on the market - why products like NetWare and WordPerfect (that were dominant at one point) failed as organizations adopted Windows. And why Microsoft has been subjected to and found guilty of Antitrust violations twice already; settled with Novell over WordPerfect (in Novell's favor mind you), and why Barnes & Noble is leveling Antitrust violations in the lawsuit brought by Microsoft against them (and numerous others).

No tinfoil here. Just reality when it comes to Microsoft.

Reply Parent Score: 2