Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th May 2011 20:41 UTC, submitted by lemur2
SuSE, openSUSE The first major effect of Attachmate buying Novell (and thus, SUSE) has come into, uh, effect. Novell, of course, is the birth place of Mono, the open source implementation of Microsoft's .NET framework. Reports indicate Mono developers have been fired as part of the streamlining process, but according to Attachmate's CEO, they weren't fired because of Mono.
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tanishaj
Member since:
2010-12-22

If they really laid-off 30 Mono devs in the US, I would be surprised not to see them re-appear as an independent company.

Miguel has stated going independent as a possibility in the past (cannot remember the link). There is a lot of commercial activity around Mono at this point (Unity, Codice, Second Life, MonoTouch, MonoDroid). I am sure that most Mono users would rather get their product from Miguel and his teach than some unknown group in Germany.

Reply Score: 2

pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

There is a lot of commercial activity around Mono at this point (Unity, Codice, Second Life, MonoTouch, MonoDroid).


MonoTouch is effectively dead. Apple killed it when they changed their iPhone developer license agreement so that you can only use C and Objective C with Apple native APIs if you want your app in the app store.

I don't know of anyone that is actively using MonoDroid.

Codice? It took a fair amount of googling for me to even figure out what Codice was. I finally figured out it's a proprietary version control system. Really? When there are so many great FOSS choices out there? People are going to use a proprietary one? Maybe on Windows they will. But Linux users aren't going to use a proprietary version control system. Not when there are so many really good free and open source ones available.

Unity might be the only one you mentioned that I would agree with you is generating any significant interest.

Side note: I predict the makers of Unity are going to claim trademark infringement against Canonical for trademark infringement and demand they change the name of their new desktop interface "Unity" and demand that they change the name. It's already causing significant confusion where when most people hear "Unity" in the context of a software product, they think of Ubuntu. Not a game development system.

Edited 2011-05-05 19:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

slashdev Member since:
2006-05-14


MonoTouch is effectively dead. Apple killed it when they changed their iPhone developer license agreement so that you can only use C and Objective C with Apple native APIs if you want your app in the app store.


Apple Backed away from that restriction around august-sept of last year. There is no restriction on what language you can use to develop an iOS app. Apple found out that a large amount of development houses are using crossplatform toolchains to build some of iOS's very popular titles. MonoTouch is a great way to leverage C# on the iOS mobile platform...as well as build a base for crossplatform apps (via MonoDroid/MonoTouch/WindowsPhone/etc)


I don't know of anyone that is actively using MonoDroid.


MonoDroid has just been released. Its too early to assess its adoption. I used MonoDroid during their long pre-release testing period. Its also pretty darn nice for leveraging C# knowledge and developing some pretty slick Android Apps. Apple's fear of apps not taking advantage of native features is a non-starter.

Reply Parent Score: 4

tanishaj Member since:
2010-12-22


MonoTouch is effectively dead. Apple killed it when they changed their iPhone developer license agreement so that you can only use C and Objective C with Apple native APIs if you want your app in the app store.


Apple never actually put the proposed language into practice. No app has ever been rejected from the App store for using Mono. Both MonoTouch and Unity are used for best selling titles on the App store. I have a MonoTouch app myself.

My point was not that any given software (like PlasticSCM) is mainstream or even that you should use it. My point is that Mono is being used as the foundation for a significant amount of commercial activity.

It looks like I will not get to test my theory yet though that Miguel and company would simply setup shop on their own. If you look at the commits in the Mono Git repo, you will notice that several Novell employees (including Miguel himself) have made commits since this article was written. Some (the same as did before) continue to use their novell.com email addresses to do so.

I strongly suspect that the rumour mill simply has it wrong on this one.

Reply Parent Score: 2