Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th May 2011 20:41 UTC, submitted by lemur2
SuSE, openSUSE The first major effect of Attachmate buying Novell (and thus, SUSE) has come into, uh, effect. Novell, of course, is the birth place of Mono, the open source implementation of Microsoft's .NET framework. Reports indicate Mono developers have been fired as part of the streamlining process, but according to Attachmate's CEO, they weren't fired because of Mono.
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slashdev
Member since:
2006-05-14


MonoTouch is effectively dead. Apple killed it when they changed their iPhone developer license agreement so that you can only use C and Objective C with Apple native APIs if you want your app in the app store.


Apple Backed away from that restriction around august-sept of last year. There is no restriction on what language you can use to develop an iOS app. Apple found out that a large amount of development houses are using crossplatform toolchains to build some of iOS's very popular titles. MonoTouch is a great way to leverage C# on the iOS mobile platform...as well as build a base for crossplatform apps (via MonoDroid/MonoTouch/WindowsPhone/etc)


I don't know of anyone that is actively using MonoDroid.


MonoDroid has just been released. Its too early to assess its adoption. I used MonoDroid during their long pre-release testing period. Its also pretty darn nice for leveraging C# knowledge and developing some pretty slick Android Apps. Apple's fear of apps not taking advantage of native features is a non-starter.

Reply Parent Score: 4

pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

Didn't know Apple had backed off of that. That's good to hear at least.

Apple's fear of apps not taking advantage of native features is a non-starter.


Unfortunately, Mono is also a non-starter if they can't keep up with Microsoft and release new versions in parallel, as well as guarantee compatibility with the Microsoft implementation of .NET.

I really hope that Microsoft does hire the Mono dev team. But I doubt it will happen.

Edited 2011-05-05 20:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

DUnfortunately, Mono is also a non-starter if they can't keep up with Microsoft and release new versions in parallel, as well as guarantee compatibility with the Microsoft implementation of .NET.


Hardly...

Most software these days can be built to .NET Framework 2.0 compatibility. There have only been a few things added since then (and 3.0/3.5 are basically the 2.0 framework with extra assemblies).

.NET Framework 4.0 is required for some of the hot new Silverlight stuff - but unless you need that, Mono can likely still run most of the .NET software out there. Any developer who targets the 4.0 framework needlessly is probably shooting himself in the foot.

Update: Existing compatibility is key, however...

Edited 2011-05-06 00:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

fithisux Member since:
2006-01-22

I really hope that Microsoft does hire the Mono dev team. But I doubt it will happen.


Or kill .Net and go with mono. For me it makes sense.

Reply Parent Score: 2