Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 5th May 2011 22:34 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "There's no doubt Android Market will at some point offer more applications for download and/or purchase than Apple's App Store, as the latter's growth has been slowing down of late, while the Android application store's growth rate has been accelerating. In a recent report, app store analytics company Distimo forecasted that Android would surpass the App Store in size before the end of July 2011. Another research firm, Germany-based research2guidance, corroborates Distimo's findings; the firm forecasts Android to blow past Apple's App Store by August 2011."
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RE[2]: ...
by tyrione on Fri 6th May 2011 05:12 UTC in reply to "RE: ..."
tyrione
Member since:
2005-11-21

How ironic that you're proclaiming Java/Android as a superior foundation to that of ObjC and Cocoa when a major portion of Java's development is based on Objective-C.

Sorry, but Apple's APIs have been honed for over 25 years.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: ...
by wuzz on Fri 6th May 2011 06:20 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
wuzz Member since:
2011-05-06

So what? Java was influenced by many other languages/APIs e.g. Smalltalk.

Overall, how typical of you.

Edited 2011-05-06 06:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by zetsurin on Fri 6th May 2011 06:44 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
zetsurin Member since:
2006-06-13

I've been doing iOS programming for a while and have already done plenty of Android as well. I'd say the language and API on Android are defnitely better. It's ironic that people always proclaim Apple's APIs to be so clean you can eat your meal off.

Just a few things off the top of my head:

- The fact you can do obj.that = 1 as a shortcut for [obj setThat:1] but you can't do obj.someMethod() and must in that case stick with [obj someMethod:blah].

- The stupid need to define a property three times across two files! Synthesize my ass.

- (void)thisVerbosity:(int)blah withStupidParameterDefinitions:(int)my adNauseum:(int)god

- The fact that there's no *proper* layout mechanisms for iOS leading to lots of code that goes assuming heights of something happen to always be 44 pixels high. No wonder mobile developers are afraid of the things we've been building for decades now: resizeable windows.

- The fact that you can't visually layout a preferences table in Interface Builder. It's always: some things you can do one way, some things you can only do another way.

- Hack for this, hack for that. Want to do text entry validation character for character as it's typed? Sure, but you need to resort to an unsupported API that Apple won't approve! Or ... Want a light blue IUNavigationItem? 'There's a hack for that'! Hacks all over the place for doing things that should be exposed in the API.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[3]: ...
by Neolander on Fri 6th May 2011 11:35 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I'd say Java was based on C++, and Wikipedia's article on Java agrees with me : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_%28software_platform%29#H... . But of course, we're still talking about object-oriented (or, in c++'s case, multi-paradigm) derivatives of C, so your mistake doesn't matter so much. No, what worries me most about your comment is that you totally fail to understand the parent poster's point.

Most developers learn Java as part of their studies. Some learn C# because their school has some commercial contract with Microsoft. But only a minority of developers learn Objective C at school. Because it never caught up outside of the Mac world, which is only 10% of desktop computers.

As iOS devices become more popular, ObjC becomes more attractive and as such there'll probably be an increasing number of schools who teach Objective-C in the upcoming years. But most of the current App Store catalog is software coded by people who have never coded anything in Objective C before. Which has implications in the area of software quality.

Edited 2011-05-06 11:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: ...
by Thom_Holwerda on Fri 6th May 2011 11:54 in reply to "RE[3]: ..."
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

which is only 10% of desktop computers.


4-5%.

Which has implications in the area of software quality.


It sure does. There's this assumption that iOS App Store = good amazing super apps, Android Marketplace = nothing but shitty crap.

Reality, however, is different: they're both basically 99% crap, with 1% good applications. Those 99% are badly coded, crash-prone, have HORRIBLE user interfaces, and are very confusing to use.

Edited 2011-05-06 11:55 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: ...
by Shane on Fri 6th May 2011 11:57 in reply to "RE[3]: ..."
Shane Member since:
2005-07-06

Most developers learn Java as part of their studies. Some learn C# because their school has some commercial contract with Microsoft. But only a minority of developers learn Objective C at school. Because it never caught up outside of the Mac world, which is only 10% of desktop computers.

As iOS devices become more popular, ObjC becomes more attractive and as such there'll probably be an increasing number of schools who teach Objective-C in the upcoming years. But most of the current App Store catalog is software coded by people who have never coded anything in Objective C before. Which has implications in the area of software quality.


Judging by the average quality of PHP code out there, I would say that language popularity has little bearing on software quality ;)

Also, from my personal experience with the industry, I see that good developers have no problem picking up new languages/frameworks/technologies. They actually seek these things out. Whereas mediocre developers tend to stick to what they know.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: ...
by pantheraleo on Fri 6th May 2011 12:19 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

How ironic that you're proclaiming Java/Android as a superior foundation to that of ObjC and Cocoa when a major portion of Java's development is based on Objective-C.


Actually, Java borrowed features from a lot of languages, including C++, Smalltalk, and I believe interfaces came from ObjC. But mostly it is based on Smalltalk and C++.

Sorry, but Apple's APIs have been honed for over 25 years.


Apparently you have a reading comprehension problem? There was never any mention of language or API quality in my comment. Only of popularity and developer experience with a given technology. I never said there was anything wrong with the Apple APIs or that it hadn't been around for a long time. I said not a lot of people had experience working with it because not many people had experience developing Mac applications. I'm not sure how you took that and transformed it into something like "Apple's API sucks and hasn't been around a long time."

Edited 2011-05-06 12:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by fatjoe on Fri 6th May 2011 13:47 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
fatjoe Member since:
2010-01-12

Sorry, but Apple's APIs have been honed for over 25 years.


I recall a discussion about a year or so ago where you and some others claimed that windows was bloated because it kept the API compatible with things developed 10 years or so ago while OSX 10.x.x was "modern" because they basically throw out the old code and started fresh every x year or so?

Anyone else remembers that discussion or am I hallucinating it??

Reply Parent Score: 1