Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 5th May 2011 22:34 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "There's no doubt Android Market will at some point offer more applications for download and/or purchase than Apple's App Store, as the latter's growth has been slowing down of late, while the Android application store's growth rate has been accelerating. In a recent report, app store analytics company Distimo forecasted that Android would surpass the App Store in size before the end of July 2011. Another research firm, Germany-based research2guidance, corroborates Distimo's findings; the firm forecasts Android to blow past Apple's App Store by August 2011."
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RE[4]: ...
by Shane on Fri 6th May 2011 11:57 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: ..."
Shane
Member since:
2005-07-06

Most developers learn Java as part of their studies. Some learn C# because their school has some commercial contract with Microsoft. But only a minority of developers learn Objective C at school. Because it never caught up outside of the Mac world, which is only 10% of desktop computers.

As iOS devices become more popular, ObjC becomes more attractive and as such there'll probably be an increasing number of schools who teach Objective-C in the upcoming years. But most of the current App Store catalog is software coded by people who have never coded anything in Objective C before. Which has implications in the area of software quality.


Judging by the average quality of PHP code out there, I would say that language popularity has little bearing on software quality ;)

Also, from my personal experience with the industry, I see that good developers have no problem picking up new languages/frameworks/technologies. They actually seek these things out. Whereas mediocre developers tend to stick to what they know.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: ...
by Neolander on Fri 6th May 2011 13:11 in reply to "RE[4]: ..."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Judging by the average quality of PHP code out there, I would say that language popularity has little bearing on software quality ;)

Judging code quality is unfair : if you only took this criteria, all programming languages would equally awfully suck, save for the most obscure ones (brainf--k, assembly) which force a developer to adopt good programming practices or get lost ;)

Also, from my personal experience with the industry, I see that good developers have no problem picking up new languages/frameworks/technologies. They actually seek these things out. Whereas mediocre developers tend to stick to what they know.

Sure, the more proficient you're with programming, the easiest it is to pick up a new language. However, you can't deny that there's a learning period, and that the first programs which one writes in a language are likely to be imperfect in more than one way.

For an extreme example : compare the amount of "for" loops in MATLAB programs written by a novice and an expert ;)

Edited 2011-05-06 13:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2