Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th May 2011 20:41 UTC, submitted by lemur2
SuSE, openSUSE The first major effect of Attachmate buying Novell (and thus, SUSE) has come into, uh, effect. Novell, of course, is the birth place of Mono, the open source implementation of Microsoft's .NET framework. Reports indicate Mono developers have been fired as part of the streamlining process, but according to Attachmate's CEO, they weren't fired because of Mono.
Thread beginning with comment 472053
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Let Mono transform
by kalcytriol on Fri 6th May 2011 16:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Let Mono transform"
kalcytriol
Member since:
2011-04-23

C++? You're joking, right? And Qt? Qt is in Nokia's hands, and Nokia is in Microsoft hands. I wish You good luck with Qt. ;)

Btw. Who is using a programming language without garbage collector these days?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Let Mono transform
by JeffS on Fri 6th May 2011 16:46 in reply to "RE[2]: Let Mono transform"
JeffS Member since:
2005-07-12

"Btw. Who is using a programming language without garbage collector these days?"

http://www2.research.att.com/~bs/applications.html

Huge list, and only partial at that.

And to be fair, C++ is mostly used for system level stuff, or commercial shrink wrapped stuff, or games, or anything speed dependent.

Your statement actually applies to either web, or internal corporate apps.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Let Mono transform
by pantheraleo on Fri 6th May 2011 17:18 in reply to "RE[3]: Let Mono transform"
pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

http://www2.research.att.com/~bs/applications.html

Huge list, and only partial at that.


From the list: "All major Adobe applications are developed in C++".

Yep. And Adobe applications such as Flash and Acrobat are plagued with security problems. They are probably one the biggest security nightmares that sys-admins have to deal with. Of course the security issues wit C++ when writing network applications are one of the main reasons it's falling out of favor in environments where applications are exposed to untrusted users.

And to be fair, C++ is mostly used for system level stuff, or commercial shrink wrapped stuff, or games, or anything speed dependent.


The speed advantage of C++ has largely disappeared with modern optimizing JIT engines like Java and .NET have.

Your statement actually applies to either web, or internal corporate apps.


That's certainly true. But internal corporate apps and Web apps are where the vast majority of development happens these days. Most desktop / shrink wrapped applications, with the exception of games, are basically legacy software these days. There's not a whole lot of new desktop software development going on other than updates to legacy applications such as MS Office. And of course, if Google has their way, even MS Office will go the way of the dinosaur in favor of Google Apps.

When was the last time you used a thick client encylopedia? or thick client mapping program for example? Or hell, do you even use a thick client email program anymore? I don't I just constantly have a browser tab open with GMail running in it.

Edited 2011-05-06 17:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2