Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th May 2011 20:41 UTC, submitted by lemur2
SuSE, openSUSE The first major effect of Attachmate buying Novell (and thus, SUSE) has come into, uh, effect. Novell, of course, is the birth place of Mono, the open source implementation of Microsoft's .NET framework. Reports indicate Mono developers have been fired as part of the streamlining process, but according to Attachmate's CEO, they weren't fired because of Mono.
Thread beginning with comment 472058
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[4]: Let Mono transform
by pantheraleo on Fri 6th May 2011 17:18 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Let Mono transform"
pantheraleo
Member since:
2007-03-07

http://www2.research.att.com/~bs/applications.html

Huge list, and only partial at that.


From the list: "All major Adobe applications are developed in C++".

Yep. And Adobe applications such as Flash and Acrobat are plagued with security problems. They are probably one the biggest security nightmares that sys-admins have to deal with. Of course the security issues wit C++ when writing network applications are one of the main reasons it's falling out of favor in environments where applications are exposed to untrusted users.

And to be fair, C++ is mostly used for system level stuff, or commercial shrink wrapped stuff, or games, or anything speed dependent.


The speed advantage of C++ has largely disappeared with modern optimizing JIT engines like Java and .NET have.

Your statement actually applies to either web, or internal corporate apps.


That's certainly true. But internal corporate apps and Web apps are where the vast majority of development happens these days. Most desktop / shrink wrapped applications, with the exception of games, are basically legacy software these days. There's not a whole lot of new desktop software development going on other than updates to legacy applications such as MS Office. And of course, if Google has their way, even MS Office will go the way of the dinosaur in favor of Google Apps.

When was the last time you used a thick client encylopedia? or thick client mapping program for example? Or hell, do you even use a thick client email program anymore? I don't I just constantly have a browser tab open with GMail running in it.

Edited 2011-05-06 17:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Let Mono transform
by juzzlin on Mon 9th May 2011 13:23 in reply to "RE[4]: Let Mono transform"
juzzlin Member since:
2011-05-06

The speed advantage of C++ has largely disappeared with modern optimizing JIT engines like Java and .NET have.


There are still advantages in memory footprint, program startup time and predictability.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Let Mono transform
by pantheraleo on Mon 9th May 2011 17:29 in reply to "RE[5]: Let Mono transform"
pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

There are still advantages in memory footprint, program startup time and predictability.


True, but memory footprint is also less relevant these days, given that RAM is so cheap these days that the average system comes with more of it than most people ever use. Startup time has also been reduced quite a bit with recent version of the VM. It's still longer than most C++ programs of course, but startup time is an insignificant percentage of the total time spent using the program. And for server applications, startup time is basically irrelevant.

Predictable? Can you elaborate on what you mean by predictable? I'd say Java is more predictable than C++. The Java VM makes many guarantees that will hold true, no matter what platform is involved. Also, because of Java's security model, the JVM makes several guarantees about program behavior that C++ does not make. If you try to write past the ends of an array in Java, the result is a predictable ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException. If you try to write past the ends of an array in C or C++ (assuming just vanilla C style array), the result is unpredictable, and could range from a segmentation fault crash, to corrupting other data in the application, to a security hole if someone can use it to execute arbitrary code. By those kinds of metrics, Java is far more predictable than C++. You must mean something else by the word "predictable?"

Edited 2011-05-09 17:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2