Linked by David Adams on Sun 8th May 2011 12:53 UTC, submitted by sjvn
Linux Only a few weeks after Canonical, Ubuntu Linux's biggest change ever - the release of the Unity-based Ubuntu 11.04 Linux - the company's CTO, Matt Zimmerman is leaving the company.
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Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

"My 20cent is smaller companies will have it tough keeping their star players in this environment."

Or, they'll just begin off shoring everything like the big companies. The recent trend is to search for cheap labor rather than talent. That's not my idea of how things should be done, but it's difficult to ignore what's happened to the US IT workers this past decade.

Reply Parent Score: 1

DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

"My 20cent is smaller companies will have it tough keeping their star players in this environment." Or, they'll just begin off shoring everything like the big companies. The recent trend is to search for cheap labor rather than talent. That's not my idea of how things should be done, but it's difficult to ignore what's happened to the US IT workers this past decade.


I don't understand your comment about going offshore, and the mention of US IT workers. Canonical is already offshore, being a South African company. You do realize it is not based in the US, correct?

Reply Parent Score: 3

twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

""My 20cent is smaller companies will have it tough keeping their star players in this environment." Or, they'll just begin off shoring everything like the big companies. The recent trend is to search for cheap labor rather than talent. That's not my idea of how things should be done, but it's difficult to ignore what's happened to the US IT workers this past decade.


I don't understand your comment about going offshore, and the mention of US IT workers. Canonical is already offshore, being a South African company. You do realize it is not based in the US, correct?
"

Some people do believe that the World consists only of US.

Reply Parent Score: 5

holmja Member since:
2009-06-09

Shuttleworth is South African (actually he has dual South African and UK citizenship), but Canonical is registered in the Isle of Man, and the main offices are in London.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

"I don't understand your comment about going offshore, and the mention of US IT workers. Canonical is already offshore, being a South African company. You do realize it is not based in the US, correct?"

The post I responded to actually referred to other US companies specifically by name.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

The recent trend is to search for cheap labor rather than talent.


What makes you think the "cheap labour" outside the US doesnt have as much talent as the US IT workers?

Reply Parent Score: 4

pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

What makes you think the "cheap labour" outside the US doesnt have as much talent as the US IT workers?


...Well, because quite frankly, a lot of it doesn't. Obviously, there are some very talented developers overseas. But there are accelerated schools in some of these developing nations for example, designed to turn out programmers in six months. Sorry, but no. You can't learn to become a decent developer in six months. Maybe you can learn how to be a code monkey in six months and pump out code if someone gives you exact specs for what you need to do. But that's about all.

In many of these developing software outsourcing nations, software development is seen as a get rich quick scheme, because compared to the salary of other industries, software developers live like kings and queens. There are a lot of people who just see it as a way to make money. A lot of them don't even have any interest in software development and have virtually no existing IT experience. But again, they simply see it as a way to make more money quicker than most other jobs in these nations. So they sign up these accelerated six month courses, come out, and think they are developers now.

Again, I don't care how rigorous your training program is. You can't produce a competent developer in six months. Maybe you can produce a code monkey. And for the most part, that's what a lot of these low priced off-shore development shops are.

That's not say there aren't some very talented developers overseas. But separating the wheat from the chaff can be difficult.

Edited 2011-05-09 17:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

What makes you think the "cheap labour" outside the US doesnt have as much talent as the US IT workers?

In essence, this is free enterprise at its best. People in wealthy countries are fat and sassy, expecting far more money for the value they deliver than would be expected by an equally talented person who happens to be positioned less advantageously, either economically or geographically, or quite often, both.

Certainly, those people positioned less advantageously have more incentive to make the most of their talent, and are more inclined to settle for less remuneration than the embarrassing degree of wealth expected by the SUV-driving "keeping up with the Jones for its own sake" crowd.

Money flows downhill. Impediments to that flow are perceived quite differently by those populations living on different sides of the impediment. Those on the high-water side might have to consider selling the Hummer.

Edited 2011-05-09 21:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Soulbender,

"What makes you think the 'cheap labour' outside the US doesnt have as much talent as the US IT workers?"


I didn't say that. I said the search for IT workers these days is for cheap labor.

In the US, corporations are laying off thousands of workers each year while expanding overseas operations at the same time.

I only speak of the US because that's what I am familiar with. Would you say that in the UK or EU overall there is no offshoring problem? I honestly don't know.

Reply Parent Score: 1