Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 9th May 2011 21:14 UTC, submitted by Elv13
Qt Since Nokia announced its switch to Windows Phone 7, people have been worried about the future of Qt. Well, it turns out Nokia is still going full steam ahead with Qt, since it has just announced the plans for Qt 5. Some major changes are afoot code and functionality-wise, but the biggest change is that Qt 5 will be developed out in the open from day one (unlike Qt 4). There will be no distinction between a Nokia developer or third party developer.
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RE[6]: Comment by ephracis
by saynte on Tue 10th May 2011 05:23 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by ephracis"
saynte
Member since:
2007-12-10


Better to program in any language but C#.


Yeah, just use Java, then you'll be safe from patent litigation then! ;)

But seriously, patent suits could come from anywhere, to be overly concerned with .Net doesn't seem useful. This is especially true when you consider that two implementations of Java have been taken to court, and AFAIK no .Net implementations have seen the same treatment.

I would say Microsoft's Community Promise actually provides more protection than is usually provided (ie, none).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Comment by ephracis
by lemur2 on Tue 10th May 2011 09:37 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by ephracis"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"
Better to program in any language but C#.


Yeah, just use Java, then you'll be safe from patent litigation then! ;)

But seriously, patent suits could come from anywhere, to be overly concerned with .Net doesn't seem useful. This is especially true when you consider that two implementations of Java have been taken to court, and AFAIK no .Net implementations have seen the same treatment.

I would say Microsoft's Community Promise actually provides more protection than is usually provided (ie, none).
"

... and I would say that Java and .NET are the only two languages that one should avoid because of threats of lawsuit from the originators of these languages.

Most languages are MEANT for people to use and program applications in.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: Comment by ephracis
by saynte on Tue 10th May 2011 09:49 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by ephracis"
saynte Member since:
2007-12-10

I agree that languages are meant to be used! C# is a pretty nice language with a good set of libraries, it should be in the arsenal for those who want to take advantage of it!

The point I'm making is that it is nearly impossible to determine in advance (who saw Oracle v. Google coming?) if there's a body holding some patents which may or may not read on the implementation that you've chosen to use.

It doesn't even have to be the originator of the language who holds the patents, it could be anyone.

Reply Parent Score: 1