Linked by Kostis Kapelonis on Sat 14th May 2011 15:43 UTC
General Development Application stores are growing everywhere like mushrooms. While users have initially embraced application stores because of the ease they offer with application installation, developers have several complaints. Division of profits from paid application and ineffectiveness of the screening process are among the major issues. Are application stores the best distribution channel possible? Can they satisfy both developers and users?
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RE: App stores...
by Alfman on Sat 14th May 2011 23:40 UTC in reply to "App stores..."
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

bert64,
"I have long held that the linux repository model is far superior, and that users would love it if only it was promoted properly... Now Apple have come along with a slightly cut down version of that model, promoted it heavily and it's been a huge success. Now think what *could* have been if the early linux netbooks had come with better linux distros, linked to decent software repositories and sufficient marketing to show people the benefits of them."

You make a lot of good points. However most consumers will follow the media hype rather than go with the best model.

The best model for consumers is clear. Owners should be free to install whatever they choose. They should be able to go to the app store of their choosing, or even download software directly from developers. Security should be accomplished via sandboxing rather than DRM.

Security configuration should be controlled by the owner, or a 3rd party "security delegate" of their choice. This delegate would set the security policies over individual applications. Unknown or malicious apps would be limited to the sandbox. The security delegate might even disable malicious apps. However since their control is elective and not imposed, this isn't a problem.


Owners who don't want to think about anything win.
Owners who want full control win.


Although this model is superior for consumers in just about every way. Vendors like apple don't want to sell devices which open themselves up to more competition.


Edit: Linux can come close, but I wish it had more out of the box sandboxing capabilities (without dedicated user accounts or virtualization).

Java web start was a good a good implementation of what I am talking about, at least before microsoft killed it.

Edited 2011-05-14 23:48 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3