Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 15th Jul 2005 10:28 UTC, submitted by rm6990
Legal SCO's CEO Darl McBride was told that the Linux kernel contained no SCO copyright code six months before the company issued its first lawsuit, a memo reveals. An outside consultant Bob Swartz conducted the audit, and on August 13 2002 Caldera's Michael Davidson reported the results.
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RE: Anonymous (IP: 24.226.125.---)
by 1c3d0g on Fri 15th Jul 2005 11:03 UTC
1c3d0g
Member since:
2005-07-06

Does this mean that we're finally at the end of this ridiculous fiaSCO?
I sure damn hope so! SCO has brought nothing but trouble for the Linux community and if there's anything they've accomplished through their miserable existence, is that the Linux community as a whole is more united and this will make us better prepared for the final battle against M$.

Reply Score: 1

Member since:

"I sure damn hope so! SCO has brought nothing but trouble for the Linux community and if there's anything they've accomplished through their miserable existence, is that the Linux community as a whole is more united and this will make us better prepared for the final battle against M$."

Holy flying cow sh*t. You need some help my friend. The final battle? Get real man, if that is your focus you are not going to get linux anywhere. Your worst enemy is yourself by the looks of what you said. So when apple has more market share which they will as time goes on will you fight them too? Why do you have to battle them? That is the problem with some of the linux community.

Reply Parent Score: 5

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

You do realize that Microsoft does see this as a battle, right? With their anti-competitive tactics, "Embrace and Extend" offensives and endless FUD campaigns, MS has long ago drawn a line in the sand. YOU may not see this as a battle, but clearly Microsoft does. So how should Linux advocates react? Ignore the threat, or respond in kind?

You see this as a problem for the Linux community, will you at least accept that this is a problem with Microsoft as well? And please don't answer that "Microsoft is a business"...Linux belongs to its community, so it has as much as stake in this as Microsoft does.

I guess that the feeling in the Linux community at large is "we didn't start this fight, but we'll damn well finish it." I'm curious to hear your arguments as to why this attitude is miguided.

Reply Parent Score: 1