Linked by David Adams on Mon 16th May 2011 02:30 UTC, submitted by Peter Alguacil
Linux Linux currently powers a majority of the world’s web servers and supercomputers. As a desktop OS, however, Linux has yet to gain mainstream acceptance. That said, there are some countries where people have embraced Linux on the desktop to a greater degree than most.
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RE: Poor metrics
by WereCatf on Mon 16th May 2011 16:09 UTC in reply to "Poor metrics"
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

It's also rather easy to find data sources that make you strongly doubt the 15 million figure. For example, in 2010 Ubuntu alone was claiming 12 million desktops, and I find it hard to believe they alone account for 80% of the Linux desktops, given the relative popularity of PCLinuxOS, Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, Mint and Arch, to name just a few of the more widely used distros.


I personally believe the 15 million figure is quite right, but I doubt Ubuntu's claim of 12 million desktops. It's likely a lot lower in reality.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Poor metrics
by Morty on Mon 16th May 2011 17:47 in reply to "RE: Poor metrics"
Morty Member since:
2005-07-06

I personally believe the 15 million figure is quite right, but I doubt Ubuntu's claim of 12 million desktops. It's likely a lot lower in reality.

Ubuntu claims always seem to be more hype than substance, so doubt those numbers may be right.

But I'd say that 15 million is on the low side, with the big distributions adding it all up. Something like 25% higher sounds more correct.

With OpenSUSE at about 7-8 million and Fedora around 4-6 million. Even with some recession the last year, it still has a size-able install base in South America and Asia. Mandriva should at least clock in at 2-3 million. They are always ignored when people pull up Linux user numbers. But you should always include two distributions that are huge in Asia, Red Flag and Turbolinux. They should at least add up to a few millions user, but I would not be surprised if they eclipse even the possible inflated number of Ubuntu.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Poor metrics
by lemur2 on Tue 17th May 2011 05:04 in reply to "RE: Poor metrics"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I personally believe the 15 million figure is quite right, but I doubt Ubuntu's claim of 12 million desktops. It's likely a lot lower in reality.


If all of Linux desktop is a mere 15 million (despite there being 52 million Linux desktops for Brazillian students ???), and Ubuntu is indeed a lot lower than 12 million, then someone has got the utterly wrong idea and has set themselves an impossible goal:

http://www.techdrivein.com/2011/05/goal-is-200-million-ubuntu-users...

"Our goal is 200 million users of Ubuntu in 4 years", said Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth.

So, I'm wondering if it is Mark Shuttleworth or WereCatf who might have a better idea of the current number of Ubuntu installations?

Edited 2011-05-17 05:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Poor metrics
by saynte on Tue 17th May 2011 06:16 in reply to "RE[2]: Poor metrics"
saynte Member since:
2007-12-10

There are not 52 million Linux desktop machines in Brazil. I believe what you're referring to is the Brazilian schools being outfitted with Linux machines in the computer labs, allowing 52 million students to access the machines.

Even given that, the 52 million number is probably a bit optimistic even seen as a number of Linux users. 52 million is likely the total number of all school children in Brazil, so that's an incredibly inaccurate way to count.

Reply Parent Score: 1