Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 16th May 2011 16:15 UTC, submitted by john
Legal This is certainly worth a meagre +1 in my book: patent troll Lodsys has actually taken the time to answer some of the concerns on the web regarding its legal threats to several small-time iOS developers. There's some interesting stuff in there.
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RE[3]: Still fsckd up
by BluenoseJake on Mon 16th May 2011 20:39 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Still fsckd up"
BluenoseJake
Member since:
2005-08-11

You really call all those steps trivial? A 7 step process? Really?

I don't agree with this patent at all, but at the same time, it is not a trivial process, that process would be hundreds, if not thousands of lines of code, just the first one "Launch upgrade process" could entail almost anything.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Still fsckd up
by WereCatf on Mon 16th May 2011 21:26 in reply to "RE[3]: Still fsckd up"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

You really call all those steps trivial? A 7 step process? Really?

I don't agree with this patent at all, but at the same time, it is not a trivial process, that process would be hundreds, if not thousands of lines of code, just the first one "Launch upgrade process" could entail almost anything.


I don't quite understand how it could be that difficult. Usually it's just a simple boolean toggle in application code that gets toggled, and requires literally 3 lines of code.

The other two methods commonly in use are: download the full package, initiate OS-specific installer for the package in a separate process, and exit the trial/lite version, and just download/install the full-version files over the trial/lite ones, add any missing files and have the application go into full-version mode if the correct files are present. None of which methods actually require much code, even the last-mentioned method requires only a few hundred lines, there isn't any complex logic or such in use.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Still fsckd up
by JLF65 on Mon 16th May 2011 21:32 in reply to "RE[3]: Still fsckd up"
JLF65 Member since:
2005-07-06

You really call all those steps trivial? A 7 step process? Really?


Yes, really. It's trivial... to programmers. It's not exactly "Hello World" trivial, but it's certainly trivial compared to tasks like object physics and collision detection, or enemy AI path selection.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Still fsckd up
by pantheraleo on Mon 16th May 2011 22:37 in reply to "RE[4]: Still fsckd up"
pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

trivial compared to tasks like object physics and collision detection, or enemy AI path selection.


Collision detection is complicated? Since when. And path finding is complicated? It's not like you need to be a mathematical genius to understand the A* path finding algorithm. It's relatively trivial.... Certainly more trivial that ensuring that upgrading a complex application with a lot of modules, including some modules you have no control over because they were created by a third party, does not hose your customer's system.

Not all upgrade needs are created equal.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Still fsckd up
by BluenoseJake on Tue 17th May 2011 00:18 in reply to "RE[4]: Still fsckd up"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

It's only trivial to the app developers, not to the developers who wrote the software stack, from the custom web framework to support the update process, as well the underlying framework in the Devices OS itself, it's trivial for the app developers becuase those frameworks expose APIs for the developer to use, be it Java, Objective C, or .net.

If you are a programmer today, you know this, you aren't going to be writing low level code to make do this, but somebody sure did.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Still fsckd up
by daedalus on Tue 17th May 2011 08:11 in reply to "RE[3]: Still fsckd up"
daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14

Yeah, it could include thousands of lines of code, but from the sounds of it, that's irrelevant. It's the process that's patented, not the code. And a simple app, having only a few dozen lines of code to download a replacement exe, could still be seen to infringe on such a patent... It's crazy! And it's code that any decent programmer could come up with independently in an afternoon's work.

Reply Parent Score: 1