Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th May 2011 21:50 UTC, submitted by fran
Windows The ARM version of Windows 8 might have just become the most desired version of Windows in our hearts and minds. After us talking about legacy code and backwards compatibility in Windows for years now, an Intel senior vice president, Renee James, has just stated that Windows 8 on ARM will not have any form of compatibility for legacy applications whatsoever. Update: Microsoft has responded to Intel's claims. "Intel's statements during yesterday's Intel Investor Meeting about Microsoft's plans for the next version of Windows were factually inaccurate and unfortunately misleading," the company said, "From the first demonstrations of Windows on SoC, we have been clear about our goals and have emphasized that we are at the technology demonstration stage. As such, we have no further details or information at this time."
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kragil
Member since:
2006-01-04

Just do the math:

Quad core 2 GHz ARM chips with dynamic recompilatin of x86 code would suffient for most programms that handle mainly text and numbers.

Multimedia and games are a different thing, but most enterprises would be happy with that as long as .NET and Java have native support.

Reply Score: 3

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Just do the math:

Quad core 2 GHz ARM chips with dynamic recompilatin of x86 code would suffient for most programms that handle mainly text and numbers.

Multimedia and games are a different thing, but most enterprises would be happy with that as long as .NET and Java have native support.


Seriously, I wonder if some posters in this site do even know what a computer does. Other than "handling numbers" a microprocessor really doesn't do much (characters in text are nothing but numbers).

Once Intel gets their new 3D process going, their new Atoms will have a very good power/performance envelope. In fact they will be rather competitive with those mythical "quad 2GHz ARMs." Given the binary compatibility they offer, it is going to be really hard for ARM to break into the data center.

And yes, binary compatibility is still an issue. That is why SPARC still has a market.

Intel and Microsoft have a long history of playing these games to do hardball when it comes to negotiate. Microsoft always dangles the hardware abstraction angle to force intel to submit, and Intel always threatens Microsoft with their next big HW platform not based on MS. It is a dysfunctional dynamic duo.

Reply Parent Score: 3

twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

"Just do the math:

Quad core 2 GHz ARM chips with dynamic recompilatin of x86 code would suffient for most programms that handle mainly text and numbers.

Multimedia and games are a different thing, but most enterprises would be happy with that as long as .NET and Java have native support.


Seriously, I wonder if some posters in this site do even know what a computer does. Other than "handling numbers" a microprocessor really doesn't do much (characters in text are nothing but numbers).

Once Intel gets their new 3D process going, their new Atoms will have a very good power/performance envelope. In fact they will be rather competitive with those mythical "quad 2GHz ARMs." Given the binary compatibility they offer, it is going to be really hard for ARM to break into the data center.

And yes, binary compatibility is still an issue. That is why SPARC still has a market.

Intel and Microsoft have a long history of playing these games to do hardball when it comes to negotiate. Microsoft always dangles the hardware abstraction angle to force intel to submit, and Intel always threatens Microsoft with their next big HW platform not based on MS. It is a dysfunctional dynamic duo.
"

Yep, see here: http://www.osnews.com/comments/24753

Well, MS doesn't depend on Intel and Intel doesn't depend on MS (at least theoretically).

Reply Parent Score: 2

kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

I meant office programms like Excel (numbers) or Word (text), maybe I buthered that a litte. Sorry, not a native speaker.

And sure Intel will maybe get really good, maybe even better than ARM, but still a quad core ARM with a good emulation could reach speeds similar to todays slowest Atoms, which would be suffient for a lot of office work.

Reply Parent Score: 2

twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11


Quad core 2 GHz ARM chips with dynamic recompilatin of x86 code would suffient for most programms that handle mainly text and numbers.


Why do you think ARM is a beast from a computing point of view? It can have 8GHZ and 16 cores and it will still suck. It needs some architectural changes to bring some performance. And if you do some architectural changes, it won't be an ARM anymore.

Reply Parent Score: 3

fasted Member since:
2006-11-09

Why do you think ARM is a beast from a computing point of view? It can have 8GHZ and 16 cores and it will still suck. It needs some architectural changes to bring some performance. And if you do some architectural changes, it won't be an ARM anymore.

http://www.geek.com/articles/chips/calxeda-to-offer-480-core-arm-se...
Servers, power savings, virtual machines, cloud computing? Ever heard of it? Money talks, and if Microsoft doesn't hear the train coming, they wouldn't touch ARM with a ten foot pole. Intel is putting on a very brave face, but they are getting thier a$$ handed to them on two fronts; smart-phone's, and tablet's. Are they going to make that server's and workstation's ,also?
I would wager to say that Intel, not Arm, is the on that needs to change their architecture .
Also, CentOS, was given Microsoft's blessing's this week, so more money could be put into things like virtualization and cloud computing. Me thinks Intel should be sharpening their pencils, if they want to stay alive . IBM got complacent, and history has a habit of repeating itself if you don't learn from other's past mistakes.

Reply Parent Score: 1

kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

I never said that it could compete with a modern X86 CPU. I would need huge caches etc. Not going to happen in 2012.

BUT if the emulator is really advanced it could handle simple Office work with ease. That is what I said...

Reply Parent Score: 2

viton Member since:
2005-08-09

Why do you think ARM is a beast from a computing point of view? It can have 8GHZ and 16 cores and it will still suck.

Calm down your x86 fanatism. Atom is highly inferior to cortex A9 in all areas except of memory bandwidth (in popular SOCs). BTW there are 6-core ARM A9 with 512bit memory bus (Toshiba CEVO).
A15 is a new arch with triple issue OoO. 4 core a15 will rival core2duo with a much, much lower power consumption.

Reply Parent Score: 2