Linked by Kroc Camen on Tue 17th May 2011 12:05 UTC
Mono Project Two weeks ago we covered the news that the Mono development team were let go kicked out by the new owners of Novel, Attachmate, apparently to move operations to Germany. Miguel de Icazza, founder of Mono, has taken this opportunity to break off on his own and has started a new company, Xamarin, to bring commercial .NET development products to iOS and Android.
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RE: Meh, who cares
by toomuchtatose on Thu 19th May 2011 08:50 UTC in reply to "Meh, who cares"
toomuchtatose
Member since:
2011-05-15

I do agree on the KISS philosophy to deploy Java instead of other less-ubiquitous alternatives.

Unless one has the need to use special features of specific platforms, there is little to no net efficiency gains from 'doing something different', considering the change costs and risks involved.

Arguably, this is also one of the reasons why Java is creating inertia for the growth of other platforms. I see Javascript as an important alternative which might gain traction provide Java loses its mind-share on developers and enterprise.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Meh, who cares
by StaubSaugerNZ on Thu 19th May 2011 09:31 in reply to "RE: Meh, who cares"
StaubSaugerNZ Member since:
2007-07-13

I do agree on the KISS philosophy to deploy Java instead of other less-ubiquitous alternatives.

Unless one has the need to use special features of specific platforms, there is little to no net efficiency gains from 'doing something different', considering the change costs and risks involved.

Arguably, this is also one of the reasons why Java is creating inertia for the growth of other platforms. I see Javascript as an important alternative which might gain traction provide Java loses its mind-share on developers and enterprise.


Interesting points. Although Javascript is not really a general-purpose language, and the variation of Javascript between browsers is a bit painful. Technologies such as Google Web Toolkit allow you to bypass Javascript for the most part, and still work in Java client-side an server-side.

Reply Parent Score: 2