Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th May 2011 18:59 UTC, submitted by fran
Gnome Something's - once again - brewing within the GNOME project. While a mere suggestion for now, and by no means any form of official policy, influential voices within the GNOME project are arguing that GNOME should become a full-fledged Linux-based operating system, and that the desktop environment should drop support for other operating systems such as Solaris and the BSDs. I have a feeling this isn't going to go down well with many of our readers.
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RE[2]: Meh
by barbieri on Thu 19th May 2011 20:21 UTC in reply to "RE: Meh"
barbieri
Member since:
2007-07-30

yes, OS definition is broad. You can't use a kernel by itself, as you can't use the programs without a kernel. (I'm over simplifying it and ignoring RTOS, special purpose OS) so we often considered the GNU userland together with Linux kernel a "GNU/Linux OS".

While this is good for servers, it's not good at all for desktops. Okay, you can assume you have GLibC and POSIX, but you can't know what sound server do you have, or which graphics system, ipc and all. Then we used to write generic system that talks to multiple (or none) of these...

This effort can be called "lost" because it could be used to improve the applications or libraries themselves. We used to have lots of half-working applications since developer focus incorrectly switched from "making it useful" to "make it usable anyware", so yes, it barely provided its core features but would run on a toaster :-D

For a while developer of various systems, not only GNOME but also E17 (which I'm a developer) started to assume some things and don't care about portability. Assume DBus, assume X11, assume Linux. When people came and complained about not working on other systems, these could be considered... particularly if the complain comes with patches ;-)

So I don't see GNOME doing any radical change other than being clear and stating what was indirected told before: developer focus is on the system they use, Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Meh
by allanregistos on Fri 20th May 2011 05:31 in reply to "RE[2]: Meh"
allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10

yes, OS definition is broad. You can't use a kernel by itself, as you can't use the programs without a kernel. (I'm over simplifying it and ignoring RTOS, special purpose OS) so we often considered the GNU userland together with Linux kernel a "GNU/Linux OS".

While this is good for servers, it's not good at all for desktops. Okay, you can assume you have GLibC and POSIX, but you can't know what sound server do you have, or which graphics system, ipc and all. Then we used to write generic system that talks to multiple (or none) of these...

This effort can be called "lost" because it could be used to improve the applications or libraries themselves. We used to have lots of half-working applications since developer focus incorrectly switched from "making it useful" to "make it usable anyware", so yes, it barely provided its core features but would run on a toaster :-D

For a while developer of various systems, not only GNOME but also E17 (which I'm a developer) started to assume some things and don't care about portability. Assume DBus, assume X11, assume Linux. When people came and complained about not working on other systems, these could be considered... particularly if the complain comes with patches ;-)

So I don't see GNOME doing any radical change other than being clear and stating what was indirected told before: developer focus is on the system they use, Linux.

I see no one could say it better than yourself. I agree.

Reply Parent Score: 1