Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th May 2011 22:03 UTC
Google Wait - is this for real? A large American company openly defying the anti-freedom and totalitarian content industry? In comments in the UK media, Google chairman Eric Schmidt took aim at the big content-sponsored PROTECT IP act. The PROTECT IP act is the US internet censorship (the China kind) law, which more or less takes aim directly against Google. In his criticism, Schmidt went far - very far. The content industry obviously isn't pleased.
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RE[2]: Not so surprising
by eml.nu on Fri 20th May 2011 09:03 UTC in reply to "RE: Not so surprising"
eml.nu
Member since:
2006-07-04

If this also affects Google's search engine it probably affects Bing too. So at least Microsoft is affected, and it'd be awesome to see them say "we'll also fight it".

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Not so surprising
by WereCatf on Fri 20th May 2011 10:41 in reply to "RE[2]: Not so surprising"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

If this also affects Google's search engine it probably affects Bing too. So at least Microsoft is affected, and it'd be awesome to see them say "we'll also fight it".


It's not an "if", it's simply not possible for Microsoft to avoid this either. Any and all US-based search engines must comply with the law and thus filter the results. This means Bing, Google, Amazon, and so on.

Having to police the search results and filter them is indeed a form of censorship, I agree with them, but there's more reasons to fight this act than just that: having to police humongous amounts of websites and search results will just create lots of extra work for these companies while the benefit is.. well, negligible; the censored sites will just change names and domains and be back, and the round starts again from the beginning. It's an endless game of cat-and-mouse that search engine providers simply cannot win.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Not so surprising
by Not2Sure on Fri 20th May 2011 15:54 in reply to "RE[3]: Not so surprising"
Not2Sure Member since:
2009-12-07

Google lost the high ground when they quit relying solely on algorithmic rankings to deliver results and started exercising editorial control by tailoring and filtering results to individual users.

They already are censoring results, they just arrogantly believe they are doing it for the good of the user.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Not so surprising
by trev on Sat 21st May 2011 05:02 in reply to "RE[3]: Not so surprising"
trev Member since:
2006-11-22

There is after all an easier way around it: host search sites outside the U.S. The net will simply route around the "broken part". If they continue making such foolish laws it will eventually convince enough people that the U.S. and companies bound by U.S. law can not be trusted to handle any Internet infrastructure (DNS, search, etc). After all Google fought this battle in China already by redirecting to the Hong Kong site. They could do the same with the U.S.

When will the government learn that it's not that hard to route around their stupidity. The real losers by implementing these laws are the people in the country who loose their job because the datacenter is off-shored. I hope search engines take a strong stand on this one and send a clear message. This is very reminiscent of companies off-shoring encryption development due to U.S. export restrictions.
http://cryptome.org/cpi-survey.htm
http://www.infoworld.com/t/business/sun-in-talks-over-us-export-con...

Reply Parent Score: 1