Linked by David Adams on Wed 18th May 2011 03:10 UTC, submitted by sawboss
General Development The name Fabrice Bellard may not be recognizable to a lot of people, but the work he carries out as a programmer and computer scientist is. . . . He is a very talented programmer, and his latest project demonstrates once again just how talented he is. Using the super-fast JavaScript engines that now come as standard in popular web browsers, he has managed to create a PC emulator that runs in a browser. As a demonstration he has posted a link to a version of the Linux kernel running in such a scenario.
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RE[2]: Purpose?
by snowbender on Fri 20th May 2011 23:04 UTC in reply to "RE: Purpose?"
snowbender
Member since:
2006-05-04

no distribution

This is the most important argument I guess. But.. you have the same advantage with Java applets/JavaWebStart, or Silverlight/ClickOnce. I know the argument with those is that you have to install something extra.

easy to backup

I know that argument too, but this is something that you have with every client-server application.

multiplatform

Java applets


I give those arguments, but I know that companies are probably gonna demand javascript applications. But see... with GWT.. you actually program in Java, to compile it to JavaScript, that you run on a browser, which contains a very fancy JavaScript interpreter to make it run as fast as possible. All that while there is basically a technical solution (applet/JWS) that let's you program in Java and compile it straightaway and run it on a very performant and mature JVM.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Purpose?
by Alfman on Sat 21st May 2011 09:50 in reply to "RE[2]: Purpose?"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

snowbender,

I had never heard of "ClickOnce". I heard that .net had something like it in passing, but I totally forgot about it.

The windows kernel driver DRM in vista and win7 totally turned me off the OS. Since I stopped using Windows as my primary desktop, I haven't really kept up with many new developments on that side of the fence.

"I give those arguments, but I know that companies are probably gonna demand javascript applications"

Yes, I know they do. A company of mine was involved in a major conversion of a client mainframe application to asp.net. The web version was fancy enough, but the paging latency went from around 20ms to 500ms.

Of course the web version is doing much more processing, but it sucks that paging through 10 screens takes 5 seconds now instead of < 1s.

Even microsoft couldn't improve it.

Sometimes old is better.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Purpose?
by snowbender on Sat 21st May 2011 11:22 in reply to "RE[3]: Purpose?"
snowbender Member since:
2006-05-04

I had never heard of "ClickOnce". I heard that .net had something like it in passing, but I totally forgot about it.


The last couple of months we've been developing a client-server application for a customer in .NET. (The customer is basically a Microsoft-only company.) The backend consists out of 5 WCF services and the frontend is a desktop application. The drawback is that the desktop client needs to be installed separately by someone with administration rights on each of the desktops (only 5 users though). A colleague told me that maybe we should look into ClickOnce. That is also the first time I actually heard about it... When I read about what it is, it made me think about JWS rightaway.

The windows kernel driver DRM in vista and win7 totally turned me off the OS. Since I stopped using Windows as my primary desktop, I haven't really kept up with many new developments on that side of the fence.


My main OS at home has been linux since around 1997. I did respect Windows 2000 though, I still think that was a really nice OS. And the DRM in recent Windows versions.. yeah.. also turning me off. What is really pissing me off, is that those big companies always succeed in forcing locks on customers (who don't know any better), while telling them with a straight face that it is all because of the better quality. Examples... HDMI-HDCP instead of DVI.. another example I saw recently: Adobe PDF Digital Editions.

When you read the explanation of that format as a normal customer... it's a special pdf that is highly optimised for reading ebooks and therefore you need to install special software. When you go find information about it as a technical person: it's a normal pdf with locks attached, and you need to use special software to read it so that Adobe can keep track of which devices you are using to read that pdf.. so they can limit the number of devices you are reading it on (or revoke your right to read an ebook after you purchased it). It is really pissing me off that companies can tell a customer with a straight face that it's a better quality pdf, while making the customer pay (indirectly) for the handcuffs they put him in. Exactly the same thing that happened with HDMI... monitors that supported it were more expensive (than DVI), because of the additional encryption hardware builtin, but to the customer no word about that.. nah.. it is more expensive because it is "better quality".

Yes, I know they do. A company of mine was involved in a major conversion of a client mainframe application to asp.net. The web version was fancy enough, but the paging latency went from around 20ms to 500ms.

Of course the web version is doing much more processing, but it sucks that paging through 10 screens takes 5 seconds now instead of < 1s.

Even microsoft couldn't improve it.

Sometimes old is better.


Exactly! In a lot of companies there are a lot of "data-input" applications. With the old-fashioned client-server applications, it is sometimes amazing how fast the people in those companies work. They use the keyboard only to navigate through the different fields and enter data. Many of those applications also connected straight to the database instead of going through for example WCF. There is simply no way a re-implementation as a fancy web application is gonna work as fast as a native client-server application.

Reply Parent Score: 2