Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 23rd May 2011 22:13 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
OS/2 and eComStation Yes, it's still being updated. OS/2 eComStation 2.1 has been released by Serenity Systems International and Mensys BV. The market for eComStation may not be particularly huge, but it still has its niches here and there. Since there might be folks here that aren't in the know: eComStation is the commercial continuation of IBM's OS/2, developed to support modern hardware.
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Seriously, It's Time to Let it Go
by pantheraleo on Tue 24th May 2011 14:08 UTC
pantheraleo
Member since:
2007-03-07

I used to be a big OS/2 fan. In fact, I even had a part time job with IBM traveling around to Best Buy stores and demoing it to customers, and giving out free copies in the stores to lucky winners. I remember how impressed they were when I would have four games of solitaire open on the screen, all on auto-play, while also playing a video at the same time. None of these people in their Windows 3.1 world had ever seen "real" multitasking before. This was back when IBM was still trying to market it to home users as a serious gaming platform and such.

But lets face it, that was 1994, and times have changed. OS/2 is dead. eComStation is not going to change that. It's ridiculously outdated technologically by today's standards (what kind of OS in 2011 doesn't even have reliable anti-aliasing, for example?). It's hardware support is awful and unlikely to get much better, etc.

OS/2 is dead folks. It's time to accept that and move on.

Reply Score: 5

daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14

Yep, let us all use Windows because that's the only true way to get the job done. After all, it is the only OS with software support from all major vendors, and the OS with by far the largest variety of supported hardware.

Edited 2011-05-24 14:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

There are other options. Like Linux. An OS that actually has a future.

eComStation likely does not have a future. There just aren't enough people willing to pay that kind of price for an OS that is effectively 15 years out of date, has virtually no software available anymore (sure you can build a lot of open source apps on it. But if you are gonna do that, you might as well run Linux), and that might suddenly disappear and become unsupported as soon a Serenity figures out it's not economically viable to keep trying to sell OS/2 as commercial software.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

I don't think anybody is arguing that it's in a position to challenge Windows on the desktop.

I would like to add that my bank still has some form of OS/2 on the desktop of their PCs. Which means that there is still a market for it. After all, there is still a market for DOS.

Reply Parent Score: 2

pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

I don't think anybody is arguing that it's in a position to challenge Windows on the desktop.

[q]I would like to add that my bank still has some form of OS/2 on the desktop of their PCs.


Your bank is probably still running OS/2 2.1, or Warp 3 or 4. There are a handful of old ATMs out there that still run OS/2 as well. IBM still provides support and patches for it to business customers who have support contracts for it. But IBM is really pushing the few remaining customers that still use it to migrate to other platforms. IBM really wishes they could completely kill off OS/2.

Reply Parent Score: 2

galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

OS/2 is dead folks. It's time to accept that and move on.


...and yet a news item about it yields 30 comments (and counting) - and at least half of them are actually on topic. That is a pretty good signal to noise ratio all things considered.

I used OS/2 for about 5 years or so back in the 90s - I have very fond memories. I don't use it anymore - mostly for all the reasons you mentioned. Yet I do not feel the need to derail the discussion about it with "its dead, everyone needs to move on" crap. If you don't want to use it then don't, but a very small and very vocal minority of users still do use it - have a little respect for their feelings.

I'm not arguing your facts or reasoning are flawed - I just don't think anyone who is actually using ecom station is going to be the least bit swayed by your post. I think they already know they are using an OS that has already seen its better days - but they just got a new release, let them have their fun with it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

demetrioussharpe Member since:
2009-01-09

But lets face it, that was 1994, and times have changed. OS/2 is dead. eComStation is not going to change that. It's ridiculously outdated technologically by today's standards (what kind of OS in 2011 doesn't even have reliable anti-aliasing, for example?). It's hardware support is awful and unlikely to get much better, etc.

OS/2 is dead folks. It's time to accept that and move on.


So, the life & death of an OS depends on the features of it's GUI & not the OS's actual performance???

Reply Parent Score: 1

sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

There's a difference between all-dead and mostly-dead.

Some OSes really are all-dead, but it's surprising how few. Older versions of classic Mac OS are all-dead, for example, because there are no new ports, little or no maintained software and no new releases. It's easier to all-dead a commercial OS because there's a finite set of sources for improvements. Open source OSes never really die at all.

Amiga? Not dead. DOS? Certainly not dead. CP/M is still alive, though his breathing is quite shallow. By comparison to these eComStation is as healthy as they come.

Think of all the OSes you've ever used or seen used. How many are running on real hardware right this minute? If nobody runs them at all any more, they're dead. How many have at least two people maintaining software that runs on them? If someone is maintaining and updating user software for an OS, it's not dead. How many still receive updates to the core OS? If the OS still receives updates, even if only once or twice a decade, it's not dead.

It's damn hard to kill an OS. It's much easier to kill off the hardware it runs on and the people who created it. Time alone will probably do both.

Reply Parent Score: 2