Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 27th May 2011 21:50 UTC, submitted by sawboss
Legal Ding ding ding ding - I think we have a record here. Launched yesterday, Google Wallet has already attracted a lawsuit. While patent lawsuits are teh shizzle these days, this lawsuit is a little different, so sadly I can't trot out my usual 'software patents bad' lines (aww). PayPal has sued Google over its Wallet service, claiming that one key former PayPal executive who accepted a job at Google took trade secrets with him.
Thread beginning with comment 474890
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
molnarcs
Member since:
2005-09-10

I never know who's the good, the bad, or the ugly in the economic arena because I'm not interested in bullfights, cockfights, or circenses Romanos.
But I know what to think of PayPal since BBC wrote on 2010.1204: "Online payments firm PayPal says it has cut access for donations to the whistle-blower website Wikileaks because of "policy violations"
"
I was just about to post something along those lines. Thanks. PayPal's conduct in this matter is abhorrent. I do hope Google succeeds in invading their turf, and I don't care how they do it. I trust Google more to withstand government censorship pressure than PayPal.

Reply Parent Score: 3

pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

I do hope Google succeeds in invading their turf, and I don't care how they do it. I trust Google more to withstand government censorship pressure than PayPal.


I hope PayPal wins myself, because Google is is simply getting to big and having way too much control over the Internet. Basically, rather than working with partners, Google is trying to create competing products for virtually everything. They have their fingers in too many pieces of the pie.

I also find it interesting that you trust Google more. I certainly don't trust Google with my personal data. Not after they have pulled some of the things they have done in the past, like share it without my permission on Google Buzz, and collect WiFi data from their cars and then claim it was a "programming error and the data wasn't supposed to be collected" yeah right... We believe that one. And then there is the fact that if you use GMail, Google's ad system reads all of your personal email and collects data from it to send you targeted advertising. I don't know about you, but I don't Google's software scraping my personal email and building a database of information about me so that it can send me targeted ads. Literally, if you use GMail, Google probably knows more about you than your best friends do.

As far as PayPal cutting off WikiLeaks, sharing classified government documents, even if you come across them accidentally, is illegal. The whole "Loose lips sink ships" thing. Also, I don't know about you, but personally I find Julian Assange to be an extremely annoying and arrogant prick. Guy seems to think he is above the law and untouchable. Hopefully he will learn that he is not.

And granted the, accusations haven't been proven true yet. But rape is a pretty serious crime.

Edited 2011-05-28 14:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

As far as PayPal cutting off WikiLeaks, sharing classified government documents, even if you come across them accidentally, is illegal.

Only if you're American.

The whole "Loose lips sink ships" thing.

There was nothing of any real intelligence value in the material leaked material. It was simply embarrassing.

Reply Parent Score: 3

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

As far as PayPal cutting off WikiLeaks, sharing classified government documents, even if you come across them accidentally, is illegal. The whole "Loose lips sink ships" thing. Also, I don't know about you, but personally I find Julian Assange to be an extremely annoying and arrogant prick. Guy seems to think he is above the law and untouchable. Hopefully he will learn that he is not.


Why should an Australian citizen, not a US resident and a free person unbound by any oath to US be subject to US laws?

He may think whatever he wishes, but US law DOES NOT APPLY to him. And the pressure that Americans are exerting on other governments is just further proof that US is an imperialist country.

If you found secret Russian documents, would you return them to the Russian embassy? I bet not, because you are not a Russian citizen.(Change Russian to Chinese, if you're Russian)

Reply Parent Score: 3

frajo Member since:
2007-06-29

As far as PayPal cutting off WikiLeaks, sharing classified government documents, even if you come across them accidentally, is illegal.


While I'd always defend your right to think in an US-centric style and, of course, everybody else's right to think differently, i.e. globally, the axiology demonstrated here is quite interesting.
Assuming that most people on this planet share the view that it is wise to consider the legality of anything one does or omits to do there remains the question how wise it is to neglect any value not implicit to legality.
The regimes of Nazism, Stalinism, and Guantanamism ought to challenge all people with a legality-only approach to reality.

Reply Parent Score: 1

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

The same company that harvested wireless network traffic instead of simply recording MAC and SSID information.

A company who's business is selling data procured through it's various services; now your email, PIM, phone calling and financial transactions can all be analyzed together for a more complete data set sold off to every marketing and gov agency that comes knocking.

A US company who will quickly bend over the table and spread wide for any official looking person in a suit waving a government letterhead rather than a legally justified warrant. "what? It's for the War on Whale Extinction? Shit. How much of our database do you need? Did you bring some DVDs?"

And, on an individual level, statistically some of the individual staff employed by Google will abuse there access to information.

I don't really trust either company as the primary purpose of both is to manufacture profits for shareholders with whatever benefit they provide to me being a bi-product of the manufacturing process. At least with PayPal, there is some small separation between Google's mega-database and my what few financial transactions I've used PayPal for.

Reply Parent Score: 3

molnarcs Member since:
2005-09-10

Now you either wear a tin foil hat or not. If you do, this link won't mean anything to you.

http://www.dataliberation.org/

And then they have their dashboard giving you full control of everything they have on you. Show which company has anything similar to that. They also have very clear policies. I know they collect contextual information to deliver targeted ads - and you know what, I prefer the non-intrusive (text based) ads they deliver, instead of purple banners trying to sell me bras at a discount in a store 5000 miles away. And if they don't scan emails for specific keywords, how do you propose to deliver relevant ads? Reading people's mind or what?

Yes, they made mistakes, but at least they were immediately cooperative with all investigations (wifi collection comes to mind). BTW, what's with that? I mean people love to ride that old horse, but essentially what they collected is PUBLICLY AVAILABLE - you broadcast your SSID, I drive by your house and see it on my phone. There isn't a single shred of evidence that they did or intended to do anything malicious with that information.

If the WIFI fiasco and the BUZZ is the only dirt you can dig up, I think they are doing fine. With facebook, for instance, you have ZERO control of your information. With GOOGLE, you can delete everything at a push of a few buttons. Now you can claim (tin foil hat on) that they don't really do it and they lie, but than we can't have an intelligent conversation, can we?

EDIT -> Forget to add - you said your data is sold to any marketing agency that comes knocking. WTF? That's facebook. In case of Google, they are the marketing agency. They don't need (indeed, it would be foolish) to sell your data to anyone, when it's the backbone of Google's success as a marketing company.

Edited 2011-05-29 16:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2