Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Mon 30th May 2011 14:02 UTC, submitted by sawboss
Google Over the weekend, Yong Zhang (yongzh), developer of emulators for old gaming systems on Android, has seen his developer revoked and all applications removed from the Android Market. While locally installed applications remain on user's device this time, they obviously cannot be updated or reinstalled by users who have legally purchased them. No warning or explanation has been sent, but the app and account removal is most likely the result of a complaint from one of the companies who own the right to those systems, as a complaint from Sega last month resulted in a couple of emulators getting removed already.
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Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

...but I think this shows why they are also important.

This is not solely a matter of having a screwed up legal system or Google again not protecting their developers. It is an experimental proof of the failure of centralized application distribution models, and of the necessity to at the very least always leave a possibility of decentralized installation. How is that not an OS-related topic ?

Edited 2011-05-30 14:21 UTC

Reply Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I'd say it's a demonstration of issues in how Google manages it's central repository more than an issue with the central repository model itself. It's too much control in the hands of an organization that does not share the user's motivations for software.

The ability to add secondary repositories and locally install packages is most definately something that should be available too though.

I'd aplaud Google if the reason for removal was malicious code included in the applications. But in this case, the issue should be between the developer and the gaming company not a third party intermediary.

Really, if the company does not provide a gaming engine for Android devices it should be happy it's being kept relevant through games for it's system remaining in use. The law abiding end users will still have original copies of the games being played (the law dismissing users where going to use infringing games either way).

Reply Parent Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I'd say it's a demonstration of issues in how Google manages it's central repository more than an issue with the central repository model itself. It's too much control in the hands of an organization that does not share the user's motivations for software.

Isn't having a central repository in the hand of a single company always going to be "too much control" as soon as user's interests go against the company's interests ? (Developers = users)

Reply Parent Score: 2

No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Nope. The issue is that some of the emulators contain code from other projects that have non-commercial licenses, so he was effectively selling warez. There are still emulators available from other developers @ Android Market.

Reply Parent Score: 5

zetsurin Member since:
2006-06-13

Well there seems to be a new alternative app store each week. While this leads to a lot of fragmentation, it does provide something the Apple model (which suffers from the issue you mention to the nth degree) doesn't provide - choice.

And finally, there's always the ability to install an APK directly. The Android Market is entirely optional.

Reply Parent Score: 2

shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Meego allows using repositories as other normal Linuxes do. Configure them, and use them. Which naturally also allows resolving dependencies and installing needed libraries and etc (which is totally messed up on Android at present).

Reply Parent Score: 3