Linked by Kroc Camen on Mon 30th May 2011 06:37 UTC
Linux Well this makes a change. Linus Torvalds has announced that the next version of the Linux Kernel release is to be '3.0'. "I decided to just bite the bullet, and call the next version 3.0. It will get released close enough to the 20-year mark, which is excuse enough for me, although honestly, the real reason is just that I can no longer comfortably count as high as 40."
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RE[2]: Kinda lame
by Neolander on Mon 30th May 2011 14:54 UTC in reply to "RE: Kinda lame"
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

Breaking the binary system call interface, in the case of Linux. Like, I don't know, giving a new parameter to malloc that is mandatory and has no default value. Or switching the integer type used to store PIDs from 32-bit to 64-bit, it that's not done already.

Edited 2011-05-30 14:55 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Kinda lame
by 1c3d0g on Mon 30th May 2011 15:35 in reply to "RE[2]: Kinda lame"
1c3d0g Member since:
2005-07-06

Isn't that just bad programming on the developer's part? ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Kinda lame
by Neolander on Mon 30th May 2011 15:53 in reply to "RE[3]: Kinda lame"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Not necessarily so. In the case of the PID example, 32-bit PIDs may have served well for decades and saved boatloads of RAM before a day came where Linux was used on clusters so large and running so much processes that the ability to run more than 4 billion processes at once became needed.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Kinda lame
by danieldk on Mon 30th May 2011 16:33 in reply to "RE[2]: Kinda lame"
danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

That's why people should use libc and use the ANSI C and Single UNIX Specification standards. If you use syscalls you ought to get bitten in the tail.

By the way, the kernel does not have a malloc system call, it is implemented as a C library function. The C library normally manages the heap, and grows the heap if necessary with the brk() (or depending on the implementation/situation mmap()) system call.

Edited 2011-05-30 16:33 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3