Linked by Howard Fosdick on Mon 30th May 2011 22:04 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Canonical Ltd., the company behind Ubuntu Linux, estimates that the product has over 12 million users worldwide. And why not? Ubuntu is free and it runs more than ten thousand applications. It has a vibrant user community, websites covering everything you might ever need to know, good tutorials, a paid support option, and more. Yet I often hear friends and co-workers casually criticize Ubuntu. Perhaps this the price of success. Or is it? In this article I'll analyze common criticisms and try to sort fact from fiction.
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bugs
by graig on Tue 31st May 2011 13:22 UTC
graig
Member since:
2010-09-18

"Several academic studies and papers conclude that Linux and open source software have fewer bugs than commercial products. Ubuntu has bug-tracking identification and resolution procedures equal to those of any large, well-run software project.

From years of participating in the Ubuntu forums, I've encountered consistent anecdotal evidence. I read very few posts where a user abandons the product due to a bug. This is a huge vote of confidence in Ubuntu. (You can't say this about every Linux distro.)"


ok. bugs is why i stopped using linux. and maybe it does have less bugs. but every time i installed the new version of ubuntu i had to spend hours fixing problems for things that should just work. the problem with ubuntu's bugs is that they are highly user facing. ie, a piece of software isn't compatible. or wont work with other parts of the system. and a work around exists in many cases, but i got tired of dealing with that.

Reply Score: 2

RE: bugs
by pantheraleo on Tue 31st May 2011 13:32 in reply to "bugs"
pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

That's a good point. It may be true that Linux in general is less buggy than Windows. But most of the bugs that Linux does have seem to be in the UI stack, so they end up affecting desktop end users. I guess that's to be somewhat expected. Linux's strong point is obviously the server market, where it has at least 50% market share. But on the desktop, it hovers right around 1%. So of course, much more developer time gets spent on the server aspects of Linux than on the desktop side.

Reply Parent Score: 2